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FdMstng99
05-07-2009, 03:23
Alright I have to take some courses for work and have a few tests I need to pass. I haven't studied for anything in a few years and just want to know how some of you guy and gals study?

Right now I just can't get anything to stick, can't remember hardly anything that I studied the night before. A little frustrated and starting to get fed up.

Thanks for the help.

Endless_Echo
05-07-2009, 03:42
I never studied for any test in my life.

Buuuuuut. I happen to know that studying then sleeping a bit earlier is much better than staying up all night cramming.

Thorzilla
05-07-2009, 03:54
You better leave the forums, turn your computer off, turn on the iPod (if that helps you focus) and get to study those books.

efs5030
05-07-2009, 03:57
write stuff down i jnow it sounds dumb but it usually helps

FdMstng99
05-07-2009, 03:58
You better leave the forums, turn your computer off, turn on the iPod (if that helps you focus) and get to study those books.

Doing that during the day and just signing on here at night to catch up on stuff I've missed.

I need total quiet in order to study, I get distracted very easily.

Lethalmind
05-07-2009, 03:59
Last time I studied (and I kid you not on this), I actually failed the test. Some study tips though:

- Don't study on an empty stomach. Food should be the last thing on your mind.

- Shut off everything

- Find a quiet room

- Get good rest

- Read aloud Helps after a while

- If quiet isn't helping, set some smooth music on to ease the mind

Hope some of those helps

Sir_Scud
05-07-2009, 03:59
For me, this is what I do.

For textbooks: Read each paragraph and write down anything that is important. If it's bolded, write it down. This process takes a lot of time and is tedious, but by reading the information and writing it down, you will be able to retain the information better. Not to mention you will be able to read your notes instead of the textbook if you are a little shaky on a certain topic.

Another method is to highlight important parts and either keep rereading those parts, or write them down later.

Past Tests: These are really useful for studying. By knowing how the professor designs each quiz or test, you have a better feel at knowing what information is important and what is not. For example, if you textbook is full of bolded terms, and the teacher puts in a matching section or fill in the blank section, you will know that knowing these terms will be a high priority.

Another note: If you are given any diagrams from class or in your textbook, study it. The process of X machine could easily be a few questions on a test.

Wish I could help more, but I don't know what kind of course work you have or what you are studying. This is just some general things I do.

FdMstng99
05-07-2009, 04:08
Great stuff everyone, tons of great advise.

Thanks for the help. Will +rep everyone I can for the help. ;)

Lethalmind
05-07-2009, 04:20
Another tip that my teacher gives me is that if I'm reading text, I should write in the margins of that paper explaining the details in short. Not a bad method, but like I have already said, I'm not one who studies.

It's proven effect for me during exams though.

R_Mac_1
05-07-2009, 05:37
Can't help you. Never really studied effectively, or at all mostly. Got me through High school in the top 5% of my class. Got me out of college quickly. Not studying + engineering major = no go.

SnakeDevil
05-07-2009, 05:41
Make notes.

Read notes a lot.

That's pretty much it. Also, brush up on your exam technique. You might know everything but if you can't apply it in the exam then all that studying didn't mean jack ****.

disposableheroV
05-07-2009, 05:44
Sorting things into bullet points and sub points really help. Titling it and organizing each related thing into it's own section. That's the most I do. I never really "study"

ScorpionT16
05-07-2009, 05:46
If your jotting down notes use red ink, Studies show people remember the color red alot better and do better.

- Take down notes, anything important.
- Take your time, don't look at the clock otherwsie you will think about time, not studying.
- Take frequent breaks, not like 3 hours but 10-15 mins...
- Think ahead, Once your done the test you can Relax, play and chill. So try to get the stuff.

Otherwise good luck on your exams or tests man...

MiNiMaL_sAnItY
05-07-2009, 05:52
Know the topics that are coming on you paper, and adhere to reading accordingly. Always start when you have lots of time, dont wait till the last minute. Study with friends if there is something to discuss over.

triggap
05-07-2009, 05:53
I get distracted easy but I realized that if I play a movie that I've watched hundreds of times before I can achieve having a sort of background noise that I don't really feel like paying attention to, letting me concetrate more on studying, but also providing something to look at for 5 min breaks then back to whatever I'm reading.

carlosb
05-07-2009, 06:31
Can't help you. Never really studied effectively, or at all mostly. Got me through High school in the top 5% of my class. Got me out of college quickly. Not studying + engineering major = no go.

I seem to running into the same problem except I was only top 10% percent :p. Luckily, I have improved somewhat, but next year will be tougher.

As for the OP, getting a good sleep does help so try to get at least something done and sleep a decent amount of time before the test. Also, try to get a group together. If it's a group of friends, you will waste some time, but you will also get things done.

Behemoko
05-07-2009, 07:17
My super secret awesome technique you say?

I don't :-)

Admartian
05-07-2009, 07:59
Yeah, most of the stuff these guys have said. If you say you like quiet, then a library is probably better or somewhere where you can't get tempted to switching on the T.V, radio, internet, console etc.

A cafe or library works well for me. :)

Also, if you're reading, read the chapter/passage through once over (regardless whether or not you've understood it) then re-read it carefully again, while processing the information - i.e thinking about how it applies.

Not taking is good too, and highlighting important 'trigger' words is good for retention. Pretty much about it.


BTW, that red pen technique sounds good. Might use it for exams in 3-4 weeks. :D

Byoushinn
05-07-2009, 08:09
One word

Anki (http://ichi2.net/anki/)

LibertyCap89
05-07-2009, 09:58
Alright I have to take some courses for work and have a few tests I need to pass. I haven't studied for anything in a few years and just want to know how some of you guy and gals study?

Right now I just can't get anything to stick, can't remember hardly anything that I studied the night before. A little frustrated and starting to get fed up.

Thanks for the help.

You have to imprint it into your brain, repeating something will usually give it more chance of sticking. People have their methods of learning, it might sound silly but some people benefit from drawing a stupid picture that represents a guys name for example, other might like to bullet point, or draw a spider-chart.

Find out what works best and the key is when you're reading out of a book, even if you don't need to, write down the things you need to remember then re-read it out to yourself a couple of times over the day/week.

Myself, I don't benefit from reading a sentence out loud but others say it helps tremendously, I like to bullet point or quote then read over them a couple of times when I can. Everytime you want to practice. Taking down notes is important but it's near useless if you're not going to keep reading over them so make sure they make sense and draw a picture or put a word that'll help you trigger your mind if need be.

MjW
05-07-2009, 10:05
As many already said above, start writing down things you need to learn and keep long notes.

rbrtchng
05-07-2009, 11:12
OK, this is from my neurobio professor's research on memory.

The best studying style is to manage your sleep cycle. So you should study, then nap a little (like 30 min to an hour), then wake up and study, and repeat.

What I do is I study for say 2 hours, nap for 30 minutes, wake up and go over what i studied to see what stuck and what didn't, study what didn't, then study new stuff, nap, repeat.

The night before the test tho, I do the worst: buy 2 cans of Monster, pull an all nighter.

fkhan91
05-07-2009, 12:34
This will work btw. If you write the stuff down bit by bit, (also use the basic study tips i.e. highlighting key parts, etc...) then find someone to talk to and tell them what you have learned, as if you were teaching them the subject.

That will stick it in your head.

Admartian
05-07-2009, 12:50
^ As above. Trying to 'teach' someone an aspect of what you have learnt is VERY effective. It uses parts of your brain to do with retention and understanding of memory.

This one is best I reckon (at least after you've read the required material ;)).

Fergus2k8
05-07-2009, 17:53
If there is like a Maths equation or something you need to learn off by heart. Write it with a bright marker/pen on a paper and stick it on a wall where you would see it a lot.

Like beside your bed, or in front of the toilet or whatever.

GTR1986
05-07-2009, 18:58
- Use revision cards: just right down enough to trigger your memory, keep going over the cards in a look, cover, write down/say out loud. check technique
- Revise with friends if possible: they will probably bring up points you have overlooked
- Get someone to test you
- Work for a certain period, then take a break. I used to work for 45 minutes then take a 15 minute break
- Spider diagrams can be pretty useful, you may remember things better if they are displayed visually
- Go over everything briefly before you go to sleep, you'll be surprised at what you remember in the morning.

Hope some of those are useful, Good luck.

Zoibie
05-07-2009, 19:15
You have to imprint it into your brain, repeating something will usually give it more chance of sticking. People have their methods of learning, it might sound silly but some people benefit from drawing a stupid picture that represents a guys name for example, other might like to bullet point, or draw a spider-chart.

Find out what works best and the key is when you're reading out of a book, even if you don't need to, write down the things you need to remember then re-read it out to yourself a couple of times over the day/week.

Myself, I don't benefit from reading a sentence out loud but others say it helps tremendously, I like to bullet point or quote then read over them a couple of times when I can. Everytime you want to practice. Taking down notes is important but it's near useless if you're not going to keep reading over them so make sure they make sense and draw a picture or put a word that'll help you trigger your mind if need be.

That's how I study, if there's a particular equation or formula I just keep repeating it to myself, or maybe rearrange it a bit to make it rhyme or something (just make sure you rearrange it correctly :p)

Revising for a subject like History or Politics is much harder though. I try and do the same though, just repeat the main points on a subject, maybe write notes down in different layouts per topic. I found that surprisingly effective, in the exam, you might be able to remember the page layout and that might prompt your memory.

Sektor
05-07-2009, 20:03
I find making my own revision sheets help. When you are given work I find it is best to convert it into a format you are comfortable with revising from and then learn it. I find it much easier.

gruddy
05-07-2009, 20:50
Buy some revision books that are short and to the point. Don't buy books with huge chunks of text. Bullet points are the way to go.

FdMstng99
05-07-2009, 23:12
Awesome advise here everyone, thanks. Had to take a break, starting to get a headache.

oaktowne
05-08-2009, 04:40
study....who needs to frickin study!!!!