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  1. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by Goobax View Post
    you really think someone with that high of an intelligence of computers and networks would be that sloppy? Its extremely easy to spoof an IP let alone set up a dynamic one.
    Seriously, nobody even gives that a thought. These guys arent as easy to find as people make it seem.

    Then cue in all the guys making jokes about them not having girlfriends, living in basements, think they should get raped, etc. Same record over and over.
    I once ate a dirty sock...don't tell anyone.
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  2. #27
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    http://www.psu.com/forums/threads/27...onymous-hacked

    continue conversation here please.




  3. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by cloudfire View Post
    Some of them is probably proxy/TOR etc but i bet many of them are the real IPs. Could be times when they were to lazy to use proxies. I bet this list is useful for all the companies including FBI working with Sony to fix this mess. Maybe they can track down some members and let the lead them to the "leaders" etc?

    Commence the waterboarding
    that's bar none the dumbest thing I have ever heard. People like to think that these are amateurs or insert lame get a life/girlfriend joke here. Not one person who is beyond an entry level "hacker" ever goes into something that can be traced because of how simple it is to hide your real IP address.

  4. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by Goobax View Post
    that's bar none the dumbest thing I have ever heard. People like to think that these are amateurs or insert lame get a life/girlfriend joke here. Not one person who is beyond an entry level "hacker" ever goes into something that can be traced because of how simple it is to hide your real IP address.

    I can list lawsuit after lawsuit from Dish Network --- via my PACER account -- where people thought they were hiding and nobody could find them, so they used something called IKS (internet key sharing). (basically, a dish network card creates what is called a control word when the receiver asks for auth to decode the picture, the card uses an intense algorithm to get the proper control word, once it's derived -- every 8 to 10 seconds a new control word is requested -- it's sent to the receiver, checked and picture is decoded and viewed by the satellite box.) IKS is a way of broadcasting the control words with an in-depth method of grabbing the control word before it's caught by the receiver, and it's sent over the internet to people who are connected to the IKS server..and they get all the channels.

    Dish has gone after people and won every case they've tried on the matter...and people claimed to "never be caught" etc..


    Fact of the matter is, I got a friend who's one of the BEST there is when it comes to net admin, and he personally told me that the ONLY way to be safe with that sort of thing is by using a hacked modem -- which is near impossible -- and editing the MAC address of the modem as well. But even if you do use a hacked modem, most ISPS can narrow down what node a hacked modem is on, so they have a general idea of where the person is. Cross referencing then is used to locate down to a block or so..and all of this is done without any personal info being "stolen" or accessed illegally. You'd be surprised how many people will tell you they will never be caught, but are among the worst when it comes to knowing what it takes to truly hide on the internet.

  5. #30
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    you do realize that the single biggest problem for comcast is people selling hacked modems right? This is FAR from complex and very easy to change the MAC address on as well.

  6. #31
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    Are those links any danger?

  7. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by powell145 View Post
    Are those links any danger?
    Depends. If you mean OP links, then no they are not dangerous.
    Platinum/100%: -Fallout 3- -Call of Duty: World at War- -Bioshock- -Modern Warfare 2- -Bioshock 2- -Bioshock: Infinite- -Call of Duty: Black Ops-

  8. #33
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    This whole PSN dowmtime will have been worth it just to be able to see a legion of these numbnuts get thrown into jail and fined up the azz for this. The Fed Penitentary would be appropriate.

  9. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by Goobax View Post
    you do realize that the single biggest problem for comcast is people selling hacked modems right? This is FAR from complex and very easy to change the MAC address on as well.

    http://zerofraudliability.com/thieft...acking-comcast

    And these two Comcast users are par for the course when it comes to these hacker-types. They are all too smart for their own good (literally, I don't mean that in a demeaning way either)...but most have little street sense, or common sense. It's a fact that the higher the IQ, the lower the street smarts, or ability to effectively negotiate common everyday practical issues...most would figure out -1/2^r * 2/x^-4.2 in about 3 seconds, but if their main water line in the house busted, they likely wouldn't know where, or how to cut it off, or even where to start with fixing it.

    It's not a bad thing to be so highly intelligent, but it does have it's drawbacks. As the link above shows, these guys were good enough to get into Comcasts site and change + affect 200 sites tied to comcast, but they put an email address in the "Forgot Password" field that led right to their doorstep.

    It's been proven time after time, and F34R can probably vouch for this being in law enforcement, there is NO perfect crime. No matter how much complexity is involved and how many steps are taken, and how much planning ahead, and tracks are covered -- someone will mess up. The person(s) responsible for the breach are likely every-day folks, with every-day problems. And it's only a matter of time. They want notoriety, they WANT to be known. They didn't breach Sony so they could go into hiding forever and die without ever having contact again with anyone. They aren't millions of dollars richer, and anything they do will lead back to them ...so it's bound to happen that someone, someone will roll (snitch, narc, w/e). The mindset of hackers isn't one that does one huge job so they can go away with their illegal gains, and live happily ever after on some island that doesn't extradite..these people who do this are usually repeat offenders. They aren't going to just give up after this and never do it again, they always want a bigger fish, or this could've been practice for an even bigger job they want to do...so it won't be the last time these folks are in the headlines. It's only a matter of time and we'll have media flocking to the first person they prove is tied to this...


    I would like to point out that I didn't say anything about Anonymous ...could've been them directly, or indirectly..or not at all. Could've been an inside job by some P/O'd ex-employee who wanted some promotion...and knew the complexity of Sony. They could've sold information that allowed someone to breach. It'll come out, just the "when" is the only question.

  10. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by jonathanm1978 View Post
    http://zerofraudliability.com/thieft...acking-comcast

    And these two Comcast users are par for the course when it comes to these hacker-types. They are all too smart for their own good (literally, I don't mean that in a demeaning way either)...but most have little street sense, or common sense. It's a fact that the higher the IQ, the lower the street smarts, or ability to effectively negotiate common everyday practical issues...most would figure out -1/2^r * 2/x^-4.2 in about 3 seconds, but if their main water line in the house busted, they likely wouldn't know where, or how to cut it off, or even where to start with fixing it.

    It's not a bad thing to be so highly intelligent, but it does have it's drawbacks. As the link above shows, these guys were good enough to get into Comcasts site and change + affect 200 sites tied to comcast, but they put an email address in the "Forgot Password" field that led right to their doorstep.

    It's been proven time after time, and F34R can probably vouch for this being in law enforcement, there is NO perfect crime. No matter how much complexity is involved and how many steps are taken, and how much planning ahead, and tracks are covered -- someone will mess up. The person(s) responsible for the breach are likely every-day folks, with every-day problems. And it's only a matter of time. They want notoriety, they WANT to be known. They didn't breach Sony so they could go into hiding forever and die without ever having contact again with anyone. They aren't millions of dollars richer, and anything they do will lead back to them ...so it's bound to happen that someone, someone will roll (snitch, narc, w/e). The mindset of hackers isn't one that does one huge job so they can go away with their illegal gains, and live happily ever after on some island that doesn't extradite..these people who do this are usually repeat offenders. They aren't going to just give up after this and never do it again, they always want a bigger fish, or this could've been practice for an even bigger job they want to do...so it won't be the last time these folks are in the headlines. It's only a matter of time and we'll have media flocking to the first person they prove is tied to this...


    I would like to point out that I didn't say anything about Anonymous ...could've been them directly, or indirectly..or not at all. Could've been an inside job by some P/O'd ex-employee who wanted some promotion...and knew the complexity of Sony. They could've sold information that allowed someone to breach. It'll come out, just the "when" is the only question.

    I understand there is no perfect crime, but I wanted to stress it's not hard to mask your IP/MAC its just your comprehension and skill level that will determine how well you are covered and despite popular belief not just anyone can in fact attempt it. Will they get careless, sure. Can they be "sold out" by one of their peers, maybe. However, I would like to believe they aren't somewhere going "hey dude guess what fake IP I am using instead of my real one listed here!" And I too believe that the higher the IQ, in SOME instances the lower the street smarts. BUT, this has nothing to do with street smarts as they aren't selling anything to some undercover FBI/DEA/LEO individuals. Anyone that hacks something to this extent and then goes and looks for a buyer is just an idiot.

  11. #36
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    Is there a way to rate this thread higher than 5?

  12. #37
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    yes true,mac addresses would be much more valuable,but i read earlier that comcast modem/routers are easily hacked to change the mac,yes they are as well as i can easily change the mac address in my speedstream 4800,very simple task but this does not make you untraceable as the ip provider has logs of these changes in real time and that cant be hidden its impossible,the only advantage of changing mac's is so you can goto sites your system has once been banned from as ip banning has become a thing of the past,these people can be traced its just how quick this info is traced back and getting warrants to said ip providers,even ones using proxies can easily be tracked as the just follow it back to proxy.get warrant for proxy provider who will then release the REAL ip of said user,proxies are just work arounds for kids in schools and people that want to goto porn sites and stuff while they are at work its not a real hide me proof system this is how people get caught doing stuff all the time here in the states anyway..

  13. #38
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    So.......... internal conflict? Drama... dumbasiss!


  14. #39
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    I recall saying just last week, "Anonymous will be its own downfall." I feel vindicated. Backtrace Securities has leaked 80 main players personal info (just ask me to see it) and now civil war again. These things can't stand for long. Anonymous will tear itself apart from the inside. As soon as a few main players are arrested, they will start singing like canaries and the whole thing will begin to unravel. A very small percentage of Anon are good hackers. The rest are just fanboys and wanna-be fakers. Take the main people down and Anonymous will no longer have any pull. The group already looks terribly foolish and has pissed off millions of gamers. It isn't so cool to be Anonymous anymore. All I can say is "Umad bro?" "amidoingthisright?" You're just fine, bro. lol

    Crash
    Last edited by Crash APPA; 05-10-2011 at 08:55.

  15. #40
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    Hope they catch those *******s and put them into jail for 7 years.

  16. #41
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    Why can`t i see this thread in the forum?

  17. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by cloudfire View Post
    Why can`t i see this thread in the forum?
    Looking in the wrong section?
    It's currently at the top of the Playstation Network area

  18. #43
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    A lot of butt-hurt here too.

    First of all, as far as the US goes anyway, an I.P. is NOT a home address and a recent court ruling has shown this. The numbers on that list are useless because it could be ANYBODY from a neighbor, a coffee shop, relative or anyone else that is logged on to that IP. -"I just had to send the link of IP's to the FBI and explain what happened" <-FAIL, and another.... "now the FBI can start a forensic analysis" <-MORE FAIL+BUTT HURT - The FBI doing forensic research on that IP list (which contains butthurt psn users) is ridiculous at best, for the .....!! - Chatting on IRC is no different than chatting here, that's all it is...a conduit for chatting. In fact, you may be surprised to hear that the traffic rose when the PSN went down?...and the "chats" were similar to these? Get informed, it's out there and should bee free. –PEACE

  19. #44
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    Quote Originally Posted by AnAnonymousHuman View Post
    First of all, as far as the US goes anyway, an I.P. is NOT a home address and a recent court ruling has shown this. The numbers on that list are useless because it could be ANYBODY from a neighbor, a coffee shop, relative or anyone else that is logged on to that IP. -"I just had to send the link of IP's to the FBI and explain what happened" <-FAIL, and another.... "now the FBI can start a forensic analysis" <-MORE FAIL+BUTT HURT - The FBI doing forensic research on that IP list (which contains butthurt psn users) is ridiculous at best, for the .....!! - Chatting on IRC is no different than chatting here, that's all it is...a conduit for chatting. In fact, you may be surprised to hear that the traffic rose when the PSN went down?...and the "chats" were similar to these? Get informed, it's out there and should bee free. –PEACE
    That doesn't mean the ruling stated that nobody could be held accountable for the actions taken with an ISP account. And it was only for THE CASE in question that the judge ruled on, he only voided the IP's as being used to identify an individual. It's by far not saying that an IP address can't be used in court ever again, that's far from fact. Not sure what's meant by "FAIL" here, but IP's are used to prosecute cases daily, where enough proof resides for an obvious guilty party.

    “I am not an IP number, I am a free man!” OK, so that’s not exactly what actor Patrick McGoohan said in the classic TV show, The Prisoner, but Number 6 would have agreed that people aren’t numbers, and they certainly aren’t their Internet Protocol (IP) addresses. And, now a U.S. District Court has ruled that an IP address is not the same thing as a person’s identification. This current decision came about because of a recent wave of copyright owners filing approximately 100,000 lawsuits against file sharers based on their IP addresses. Mind you, the organizations, such as the Motion Picture Association of America (MPAA) and the Recording Industry Association of America (RIAA) know that lawsuits don’t actually stop file piracy. In a recent statement to the Commerce Department these groups and their allies wrote, “The role of lawsuits in solving the online theft problem is clearly limited “For instance, bringing clear-cut claims against major commercial infringers is not by itself a solution in the long run. These cases take years to litigate and are an enormous resource drain.”
    That hasn’t stopped them though from suing file-sharing services, such as Lime Wire for, I kid you not, $75 trillion in damages. This recent wave of lawsuits isn’t about taking a leading file-sharing service out behind the barn for a whipping. No, this recent lawsuit flood was designed to scare individual file sharers using services such as BitTorrent from sharing files.
    One of their main tools, using IP addresses as unique personal identification tools, has just been ruled out in the case, VPR Internationale v. Does 1-1017. U.S. District Court Judge Harold Baker ruled that VPR, a Canadian adult film company, couldn’t subpoena ISPs for the personal information connected to their subscribers’ IP addresses. His logic was that just because an activity has been conducted from a specific IP-address doesn’t mean that the IP address’ owner has actually done anything wrong.
    As Judge Baker wrote, “In this case, not a single one of the plaintiff’s 1.017 potential adversaries has been identified. … Moreover, VPR ignores the fact that IP subscribers are not necessarily copyright infringers.” He also said that even when the ISP does provide an IP address’ subscriber information that the subscriber may not be guilty of any crime.
    In his decision, Baker cited the recent example of Federal agents arresting a couple and seizing their computer, iPhones, and iPads for child porn only to find out later that it was a neighbor who had used their Wi-Fi connection to download the illegal material. This kind of situation, where someone is arrested for what’s done without their knowledge or consent with their network connection, is not uncommon.
    While Judge Baker’s decision will make it harder for copyright owners and their organizations to take a “guilty until proven innocent” approach, there’s another lesson here too. You need to secure your Wi-Fi connection. Sure, anyone piggy-backing on your Wi-Fi connection is probably just using it to check their e-mail, but there’s that one time in a thousand where they may be doing some illegal and it will be you, not them, explaining to a court that it wasn’t you who downloaded am illegal copy of The Hurt Locker.
    http://www.zdnet.com/blog/networking...ot-people/1022

    It doesn't say that IP addy's can't be used ever again in court, or that Anon can walk away scot-free if they are involved in the Sony breach because IP addys can't be brought in as evidence.

    It's not going to take much longer before we have laws that require you to secure you're network, or sign a waiver of rights if someone uses your connection illegally (i.e child porn, et al)

    We live in a society that's drastically dependent on the internet, obviously so because IPv4 is nearly out of addresses to hand out, hence reason for IPv6 being brought in. And anyone who signs up for ISP service also has a long TOS agreement, and I look for a supreme court ruling in the future to require ISP's to provide some type of assistance to customers to help insure they secure a wireless connection, and if that's turned down, or refused, then the waiver would be used to say "I decline to receive assistance securing my connection, and I take full liability for actions taken using my assigned IP address at any given time."

    You're ID'd by your driver license...Prank phone calls give police the right to investigate if you call and threaten to murder someone..though it may not be the account holder, call 9-1-1 and hang up the phone on them, or prank them...then tell the officer that pulls up you didn't do it. Of course your phone number doesn't identify you as an individual, but you're STILL liable for who you let use your phone.
    Last edited by jonathanm1978; 05-10-2011 at 12:38.

  20. #45
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    Actually,
    There have now been more and more cases coming to the same conclusion, This started a long time ago, too much $$ finding dead-ends. The humility of being falsely accused has now become in-humane. So, you CANNOT pursue, by getting a court warrant, unless you have absolute proof that the IP leads to the person(s) guilty first. The web-server at this blog has a list of every single IP address that connects to it. It is not very hard to acquire such information and post it up for all to see. Now I ask, would you say the majority of posts here are coming from households that have one single computer and the exact same user at all times? I am all for finding dirt-balls that deserve to be dead for atrocities beyond human nature, if it can be done, then sniff em' out by whatever means possible. I am just merely raising awareness about what an IP address really means to a typical household. Any WiFi point can be accessed very easily by friends, family and can be easily hacked, several users are on the same PC at home and they all share the IP same address, everyone. - Best Regards

  21. #46
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    Quote Originally Posted by AnAnonymousHuman View Post
    Actually,
    There have now been more and more cases coming to the same conclusion, This started a long time ago, too much $$ finding dead-ends. The humility of being falsely accused has now become in-humane. So, you CANNOT pursue, by getting a court warrant, unless you have absolute proof that the IP leads to the person(s) guilty first. The web-server at this blog has a list of every single IP address that connects to it. It is not very hard to acquire such information and post it up for all to see. Now I ask, would you say the majority of posts here are coming from households that have one single computer and the exact same user at all times? I am all for finding dirt-balls that deserve to be dead for atrocities beyond human nature, if it can be done, then sniff em' out by whatever means possible. I am just merely raising awareness about what an IP address really means to a typical household. Any WiFi point can be accessed very easily by friends, family and can be easily hacked, several users are on the same PC at home and they all share the IP same address, everyone. - Best Regards

    As I said, prank call 9-1-1 and see who gets a visit from the police. You stated the reason that the Supreme court will make a ruling involving this to say that people are required, by law, to run a secure wifi if they choose wireless, or they will be required to sign a waiver stating they understand the risks associated with doing it, and will be liable for damages if their network is accessed by someone without their knowledge.

    As I have also stated in other posts on this site, I can post .pdfs from my PACER account showing where Dish Network, J.J. Gee and Echostar were granted MILLIONS, literally, in judgements from evidence gathered solely from IP addresses and CI's on the cases. It all depends on how much proof there is and what the cases involve.

    When it comes to the case against _______ for the Sony breach, it's not going to be some guessing game or the same scenario as a few people who download an mp3 file.

  22. #47
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    Quote Originally Posted by bitbydeath View Post
    this is why they should not have messed with psn, it was bound to **** off people who are a lot smarter than all the members of anonymous combined.

    They dug their own grave.

    lol, ok.
    3EYOND


  23. #48
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    You can't take down the PSN and expect nothing to happen. These guys got owned hard and now SONY will use that leaked data to take them all to court xD

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  24. #49
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    I agree with just about everything you said, including the PSN breach however, The WiFi's that are being cracked are already secured with state of the art security protocols 64, 128WEP and so on. As long as there are locks and codes, there will be those that will pick, crack and hack. So the Supreme Court doesn't need to impose common sense on everyone, it's kind of like tying your shoes before you go out. The secure wifi is what some are intruding upon so, what can the Supreme Court do? - I do thank you for the intelligent conversation, my first post was written after reading posts written by very in-informed folks...I was simply raising awareness, as there most definitely are several upset PSN users on "the list" of ip's that was released. And most with a little experience and free knowledge can prevent their real ip from showing up for better security. I must leave now, but again, thank you for a rational conversation which has been hard to come by lately. -Best Regards

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    Lol you people do realize that it is highly unlikely that the users of the sites he got the IP's from were using a proxy or whatever to mask their IP every time they used the site? He probably took the ones that were the most common appearing of the users and posted those.

    Oh and just because you use a proxy doesn't mean you can't be tracked. A good hacker can track an IP through 100 proxies if he knows what he is doing. You can always ALWAYS trace something back to the source, especially when it comes to the Internet.
    Trust me if Sony or the FBI wanted to find these guys, they would find them simple as. You really think these people are smarter than the FBI?(Or whoever would be hired to track them down). They may not be amateurs, but they would obviously not be the smartest out there.

    And before you come at me with 'you can erase your presence from anywhere on the internet', that's untrue. Someone could always know a different way of tracking you down that you are unaware of or don't know how to cover up.

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