Peter Molyneux: Microsoft "won" this console generation, is no longer competing with Sony and Nintendo

Good old Peter Molyneux, never a man at a loss for a bold claim. Mere hours from Microsoft's next gen Xbox event, Lionhead's old boss has told the BBC that Xbox 360 is the big winner this generation. Moreover, Molyneux argues that the manufacturer no longer competes principally with Sony and Nintendo - it's taking on broad entertainment hardware companies such as Apple, Google and Samsung.
Molyneux's not too blown away by what he knows of next generation consoles. "2013 is proving to be the year of the console hardware refresh," he began. "Although it's exciting, it's not nearly as exciting as when the Xbox 360 exploded onto the gaming scene just over seven years ago.

"Back then, the 360 represented a huge leap forward in gaming, with a tangible increase in performance and fantastic multiplayer support. Gamers and game-makers were justifiably super-excited.

"Now it is that time again, but the world has changed. Tablet, mobile PC and smartphone makers are refreshing their hardware on what feels like almost a weekly basis. And on the horizon looms Valve with its PC-based Steam Box. Thereby hangs the problem for Microsoft: how to justify its new console, how to get us all excited.



"Its competition is no longer Sony and Nintendo, but rather Apple, Google and Samsung. Rightfully, Microsoft can claim it won the last console generation. However, it has always targeted the living room as the big prize. That's why it packed the 360 with an array of "living room" features to try to persuade us that the machine could be a mix of set-top box, internet music streamer and Facebook

browser."
Having quit Microsoft in March 2012, Molyneux would like the next Xbox to put the focus back on videogames. "When I used to work at Microsoft the key phrase that I used to hear bandied around was the next Xbox should be "input one" on people's living room screen. Nowadays I'm an independent designer and I just want the next Xbox to be a great gaming machine
.

"It should have great connectivity, so I can play spectacular games with my friends and be sold at a reasonable price, perhaps around $300 (£200). That should be Microsoft's goal rather than persisting in trying to make it a box for everyone." He's made similar comments to Edge in the recent past.
http://www.oxm.co.uk/54324/peter-mol...-and-nintendo/

You see what happens when you open your mouth, shit comes out