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  1. #1
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    AMD Unveils the Radeon RX 480

    So ... AMD has announced their new GPU:



    From the looks of things, it appears they are actually using lower settings on the AMD side compared to the 1080 GTX, which is just incredibly silly. Unless I'm mistaken, but there appears to be more going on and more detail on the NVIDIA side (and they're running two of these in CrossFire by the way ... as opposed to the single NVIDIA card).

    It's also convenient they are using the FE price of $700 (instead of the normal $600 price) to compare to the $500 price of the dual AMD GPUs to make the difference seem more dramatic. And they didn't even mention the 1070, which is what these things would really be competing with, which ends up costing way less than these two cards for the same performance. This was just a sad announcement so far. Also, the guy speaking has the stage presence of a potato.


    Thoughts?

    Here's an article from PC World (they seem way more excited than I do):

    AMD's Radeon RX 480 brings high-end graphics to the masses for just $200
    The move to 14nm FinFET technology will let AMD's new $200 Radeon tango with the GTX 980 and Radeon R9 390X.




    The next-generation graphics card war is officially on—though it’s already shaping up very differently than previous versions. While Nvidia kicked things off with the overwhelming firepower of the enthusiast-only $600 GeForce GTX 1080 and $380 GTX 1070, AMD’s attacking the mainstream instead.
    In a livestream from Computex in Taipei, AMD announced that the Radeon RX 480 will be the first graphics card based on its forthcoming Polaris graphics processors. And get this: The Radeon RX 480 stands ready to deliver performance equivalent to what today’s $500 graphics cards offer, as first reported in the Wall Street Journal earlier today. That’s roughly in line with the Radeon R9 390X, GeForce GTX 980, or air-cooled Radeon Fury.
    But here’s the real bombshell: The Radeon RX 480 will cost only $200 when it goes on sale on June 29.
    Things just got real.

    Bringing the future to the masses

    Assuming that AMD’s performance claims prove accurate in real-world gaming scenarios, the massive performance leap stems from the adoption of 14nm FinFET technology in Polaris, a leap forward by two full technological generations for graphics processors. Both AMD and Nvidia (which uses 16nm FinFET tech in its new Pascal GPUs) had languished at 28nm since late 2011, after 20nm technology proved to be a bust for graphics cards.




    As you can see by the chart above, the Radeon RX 480 will be available with both 4GB and 8GB memory configurations, with data sent over a 256-bit bus. One interesting tidbit that jumps out immediately is the power consumption: 150 watts over a single 6-pin connector is far, far, far, far less energy than the ridonkulously power-hungry R9 390X demands, but it’s identical to the power requirements for the GTX 1070, which delivers higher Titan X-esque levels of power.

    The exterior of the Radeon RX 480—at least the reference version—mimics the slick, attractive design found in AMD’s own Radeon Nano and Fury X, and that’s nothing but a good thing.


    The Radeon RX 480’s power efficiency.


    Dragging previously high-end performance down to an affordable $200 price point will let AMD dominate for the crucial mainstream graphics market until Nvidia releases a GTX 1060. Its rock-bottom price point could also help AMD compete well against the GTX 1080, as a pair of Radeon RX 480s running in CrossFire cost significantly less than Nvidia’s flagship, but potentially deliver similar performance...assuming a given title supports multi-GPU setups well, at least.

    The comparison below stacks the deck for AMD a bit, as Ashes of the Singularity is a card that heavily favors AMD’s cards in DirectX 12, but it still serves to drive home what’s possible with a pair of Radeon RX 480s.




    The Radeon RX 480 will also expand the total overall market for virtual reality—a key new battleground for computing. AMD’s been beating the drum loudly with its LiquidVR development kit initiative and the Radeon Pro Duo, a dual-GPU beast of a graphics card devoted to VR game development.

    “What I’m most excited about with Radeon RX 480 (Polaris) is that it could increase the penetration of both HTC Vive and Oculus Rift VR solutions and increase VR accessibility for more gamers,” says Patrick Moorhead, founder and principal analyst at Moor Insights & Strategy. “A VR-ready GPU at $199 democratizes PC VR solutions and enables even lower-cost VR solutions in the future.”

    Let’s say it again, because it’s borderline mind-boggling: The first Polaris-based Radeon graphics card will cost only $200, and it will deliver roughly GTX 980-level performance according to AMD. That’s crazy. AMD will sell Radeon RX 480s by the boatload at least until a GTX 1060 appears—and maybe even after. If the performance claims hold true, that $200 price point seems awfully competitive compared to Nvidia’s Pascal-based graphics cards, going by the GTX 1070’s Titan X-like power and $380 cost.

    The crystal ball is unclear

    Beyond the immediate excitement of this particular announcement, what the future holds and what this means for every other graphics card out there is a real question.

    The thought of a $200 Radeon with performance comparable to a Fury is mightytantalizing, and the price gulf between this new card and the $380 GTX 1070 is more of a chasm. Still, the combination of those two next-generation graphics cards’ entering the market basically renders every Radeon R300 and Fury card over $150 utterly irrelevant. There is zero reason to buy any Radeon graphics card but the new one for gaming right now, unless you need the Fury X or Nano’s unique form factor for a specialty build. Everything else in the Radeon lineup is simply too high-priced compared to either the new Radeon or the GTX 1070.


    The Radeon RX 480.


    The same can be said about everything Nvidia sells in the low- to mid-range: There’s zero reason to buy a GTX 950 or 960 right now with the $200 Radeon looming. But it’s easy to envision Nvidia rushing out a GTX 1060 or GTX 1060 Ti to combat the Radeon RX 480, while AMD’s GPU roadmap indicates that its Fury successors—the Vega family of GPUs, with second-generation high-bandwidth memory—won’t be out until around the end of the year.

    In fact, AMD’s press info about the Radeon RX 480 specifically calls out a “new ‘Water Drop’ strategy aimed at releasing new graphics architectures in high volume segments first to support continued market share growth for Radeon GPUs.”

    That leaves a tremendous amount of uncertainty in the graphics world. Will AMD indeed surrender the new high-end to Nvidia for months into the future? Will Nvidia be able to get a GTX 1060 out the door in short order and battle the new Radeon? Will future AMD Polaris GPUs be as aggressively priced as this initial one, potentially forcing Nvidia to drive down prices of the GTX 1070 and 1080 to match? It’s all up in the air right now.
    One thing is certain: The release of AMD’s first Polaris GPU, with a compelling price point and jaw-dropping performance, is nothing but a good thing for the PC gaming masses. The next-gen graphics card war is on, and it’s an exciting time to be a PC gamer.
    Source: http://www.pcworld.com/article/30774...he-masses.html

    I didn't notice any "jaw-dropping" performance that this article states. Two AMD cards to match the 1080 GTX? How is that jaw-dropping? smh
    Last edited by Brandon; 06-01-2016 at 09:03.

  2. #2
    I have read this new a few minutes ago. According to the news, AMD show off a great score. If this GPU is compatible with all games, it would be great news.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by tberty View Post
    I have read this new a few minutes ago. According to the news, AMD show off a great score. If this GPU is compatible with all games, it would be great news.
    They showed off two of these in CrossFire in a side-by-side comparison with the 1080 GTX with what appears to be lowered graphical settings on AMD's side (I could be wrong). I'll be eagerly awaiting benchmarks, but I'm not impressed so far. There's no point in toting "150 watt" power efficiency when you need two of these to match anything NVIDIA has at 180 watts with a single card. It's no longer power efficient. It almost feels like AMD is just joking and they're going to reveal their real card soon. Otherwise, color me underwhelmed.
    Last edited by Brandon; 06-01-2016 at 09:43.

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    I think the excitement is that AMD are actually there this time, standing with Nvidia, putting out a new card that is not only competitive, but very aggressively priced. It is a promising prospect for a new buyer that they can buy one 480 now, and in a year buy a second 480, and be sitting in the rough ballpark of a flagship $700 chip, and still for less money.

    Keep in mind, this is a mid-tier card. It's probably not trying to say it will stand alone and beat a 1080. But it does put the coming line-ups in perspective.
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  5. #5
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    AMD Unveils the Radeon RX 480

    The 1070 costs less than two of these, is just as powerful, and uses half the wattage in a single card. Please tell me how two of these is exciting? It ends up costing more, not less. The 1070 is only $380. Requiring two AMD cards to match this, which ends up costing more, is completely nonsensical. They're not competing with the 1080 to begin with. They're competing on a budget tier and it makes zero sense to get two of these for $500 when the 1070 of $380. This is a failure in my eyes. The 1070 is already being shown as matching or exceeding the 980 Ti and Titan X in various benchmarks. And all in a low-power, low-price, single card solution. I just fail to see anything to get excited about here and I was really looking forward to seeing what they were going to come up with. Sadly, it looks like the price to performance goes to NVIDIA right now with the 1070. I'll be awaiting benchmarks for sure though.
    Last edited by Brandon; 06-01-2016 at 12:02.

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    Yeah....no one is going to buy two of these instead of one 1070 unless they are just crazy AMD fanatics. But this is ideal for folks like sainjara who isn't looking to pay for top of the line. If this article is correct then you are getting a 980 equivalent for $200. Hell, the 970s are still priced around $300. 1070 still may be the better bang for the buck, but that $200 is going to be extremely appealing to a lot of folks. Including me.











  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Brandon View Post
    Please tell me how two of these is exciting? It ends up costing more, not less. The 1070 is only $380. Requiring two AMD cards to match this, which ends up costing more, is completely nonsensical.
    But it doesn't. Under DX12 titles (as is implied by AoS) it's $400 for 1080 performance levels. The 1070 performs worse, and cost the same.

    They're not competing with the 1080 to begin with. They're competing on a budget tier and it makes zero sense to get two of these for $500 when the 1070 of $380.
    I think they know that though. Emphasis on the "Budget". The point of a budget card is to get as much out of it as possible. This card is meant to drive VR headsets, and is a dirt cheap entry point for it, which adds to it's "budget" appeal. I'm speaking about the single card, not it's Xfire figures in AoS. The GPU core can power the needed resolution, and it comes with the VRAM needed to hold the needed framebuffer.

    The 1070 is already being shown as matching or exceeding the 980 Ti and Titan X in various benchmarks. And all in a low-power, low-price, single card solution. I just fail to see anything to get excited about here and I was really looking forward to seeing what they were going to come up with. Sadly, it looks like the price to performance goes to NVIDIA right now with the 1070. I'll be awaiting benchmarks for sure though.
    Why would you compare a mid-tier GPU to a high end GPU though? The High end GPU is obviously the better card.

    This card is essentially the G3258 Pentium. The Pentium wasn't a powerful chip. But it was dirt cheap, offered enthusiast level tweaking, and performed solidly, which was bolstered further by the aforementioned tweaking. It was a great Budget CPU for a time.

    With this GPU, a mid-tier PC is capable of using VR headsets like the vive, or Occulus. You don't need to fork out $400, or even $600 for a brand new GPU, AMD are offering an entry point at $200. A price point unmatched by anybody.
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    This solution IMHO, is great as a lower-end mid-tier alternative. I don't expect these cards to compare with the 1070 or 1080. I expect one of these cards to compare with the 1060 or as a cheaper alternative to the current 980Ti that is currently out and costing bananas. The fact is, this is a budget build card. I'm looking for Vega or whatever it's called to be released in October or later in the year to compete with the 1080 and 1080Ti. I'm also looking forward to AMD doing something to compete with the next generation of Titans. For $200, you can't go wrong.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ezekiel View Post
    This solution IMHO, is great as a lower-end mid-tier alternative. I don't expect these cards to compare with the 1070 or 1080. I expect one of these cards to compare with the 1060 or as a cheaper alternative to the current 980Ti that is currently out and costing bananas. The fact is, this is a budget build card. I'm looking for Vega or whatever it's called to be released in October or later in the year to compete with the 1080 and 1080Ti. I'm also looking forward to AMD doing something to compete with the next generation of Titans. For $200, you can't go wrong.
    Exactly.

    And unless there was some seismic shift with Pascal for the 1060, the 480 is going to walk all over it in DX12/Vulkan benchmarks.... Granted, not really relevant now, but adds to the "budget" appeal further since it's legs can be stretched a little longer for future titles.

    It's in a very strong position, especially if AMD can capitalize on it with the bigger brother chips - 490, 490X. Would be nice to see a HBM2 chip out this year with Vega, sadly i doubt it.... That card would be a 4K beast imho.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fijiandoce View Post
    Exactly.

    And unless there was some seismic shift with Pascal for the 1060, the 480 is going to walk all over it in DX12/Vulkan benchmarks.... Granted, not really relevant now, but adds to the "budget" appeal further since it's legs can be stretched a little longer for future titles.

    It's in a very strong position, especially if AMD can capitalize on it with the bigger brother chips - 490, 490X. Would be nice to see a HBM2 chip out this year with Vega, sadly i doubt it.... That card would be a 4K beast imho.
    I think the 490 will compete very well against the 1070 and I think the 490X will compete very well against the 1080. What remains to be seen is what their memory solution will be. I'm hoping they put in HBM or HBM2 for those cards Also, I expect some manufacturers will do X2 models of the 490X and these beasts will be very strong.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Fijiandoce View Post
    But it doesn't. Under DX12 titles (as is implied by AoS) it's $400 for 1080 performance levels. The 1070 performs worse, and cost the same.
    No, they clearly state $500 in the video. The 1080 is $600 and the 1070 is $380. Both are single cards that are around 180 watts. To match this, AMD demonstrated using two cards in CrossFire. THEY'RE USING TWO CARDS. Is this point being ignored? This would require a relatively large case and a more powerful PSU. The "power efficiency" is negated when two are required to match a single card that's 180 watts.


    I think they know that though. Emphasis on the "Budget". The point of a budget card is to get as much out of it as possible. This card is meant to drive VR headsets, and is a dirt cheap entry point for it, which adds to it's "budget" appeal. I'm speaking about the single card, not it's Xfire figures in AoS. The GPU core can power the needed resolution, and it comes with the VRAM needed to hold the needed frame buffer.
    Yes, for a budget VR system it's good.


    Why would you compare a mid-tier GPU to a high end GPU though? The High end GPU is obviously the better card.
    They're putting two cards together against a single card. This is AMD's doing. That's why I brought it up. Also the fact that they completely ignored the 1070 and its price for this demonstration.

    With this GPU, a mid-tier PC is capable of using VR headsets like the vive, or Occulus. You don't need to fork out $400, or even $600 for a brand new GPU, AMD are offering an entry point at $200. A price point unmatched by anybody.
    Yes, I wasn't arguing against the single card usage of these ... just that they used two of these in CrossFire against a single NVIDIA ... on top of using the obvious inflated Founder's Edition price ... while also ignoring the $120 cheaper-than-their-Xfire-setup 1070. That is what I'm having an issue with. Obviously this announcement as a budget card is good news.
    Last edited by Brandon; 06-01-2016 at 17:54.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Brandon View Post
    No, they clearly state $500 in the video. The 1080 is $600 and the 1070 is $380. Both are single cards that are around 180 watts. To match this, AMD demonstrated using two cards in CrossFire. THEY'RE USING TWO CARDS. Is this point being ignored? This would require a relatively large case and a more powerful PSU. The "power efficiency" is negated when two are required to match a single card that's 180 watts.



    Yes, for a budget VR system it's good.



    They're putting two cards together against a single card. This is AMD's doing. That's why I brought it up. Also the fact that they completely ignored the 1070 and its price for this demonstration.


    Yes, I wasn't arguing against the single card usage of these ... just that they used two of these in CrossFire against a single NVIDIA ... on top of using the obvious inflated Founder's Edition price ... while also ignoring the $120 cheaper-than-their-Xfire-setup 1070. That is what I'm having an issue with. Obviously this announcement as a budget card is good news.
    I agree with there being much too much PR talk and things just generally looking too cherry picked... lets see what happens when impartial reviewers get their hands on these, with consistent settings on identical systems with numerous high taxing games before drawing any real conclusions because, like you, I'm not falling for it yet. Great news that they're offering a cheap alternative to those who might want to stagger an upgrade path, but I will have to say I'd still rather have a single powerful card than have to rely on the developers getting proper crossfire/SLI support in their games/drivers.

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    Quote Originally Posted by XperienZ View Post
    I agree with there being much too much PR talk and things just generally looking too cherry picked... lets see what happens when impartial reviewers get their hands on these, with consistent settings on identical systems with numerous high taxing games before drawing any real conclusions because, like you, I'm not falling for it yet. Great news that they're offering a cheap alternative to those who might want to stagger an upgrade path, but I will have to say I'd still rather have a single powerful card than have to rely on the developers getting proper crossfire/SLI support in their games/drivers.
    Yes, exactly.

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    I've been reading it's more like 15-20% slower than the 1070 yet half the price. If that's the case it's extremely competitive and will appeal to a lot of pc gamers.

    Also that game in the video uses procedural map and texture generation, which is why the two sides look different.
    Last edited by Nerevar; 06-02-2016 at 01:45.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Nerevar View Post
    I've been reading it's more like 15-20% slower than the 1070 yet half the price. If that's the case it's extremely competitive and will appeal to a lot of pc gamers.
    I guess all we can do is wait for real-world benchmarks.


    Also that game in the video using procedural map and texture generation, which is why the two sides look different.
    They said they were using "similar settings ... which I have no idea what that means. Why aren't they using the exact same settings? >_> Seems like both AMD and NVIDIA like to mess with our heads.

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    I have to agree that there is too much cherry-picking of data and parameters. But a lot of this stems from the fact that Nvidia - like Intel - are releasing software that show them to be in a better light. The benchmark software should be done by a third party, unaffiliated with any corporation.

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    If this card is even close to being as good as they are saying then I'm going to jump on it. Even the 1070 is a bit too much out of pocket for me. But the leap I'll get from my 280x to the 480 would be ridiculous. Of course, I'm not running a 4K system. Probably won't for some time. So anything more than this would probably be overkill anyway.











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    Quote Originally Posted by Christopher View Post
    If this card is even close to being as good as they are saying then I'm going to jump on it. Even the 1070 is a bit too much out of pocket for me. But the leap I'll get from my 280x to the 480 would be ridiculous. Of course, I'm not running a 4K system. Probably won't for some time. So anything more than this would probably be overkill anyway.
    If you're just doing 1080p, this could definitely be a killer card for you ... depending on how real-world benchmarks go. I'll be gaming on my 65" 4K Bravia. It's going to be a small case for mobility, so this AMD card is not an option for me. Maybe the 490X will be something to consider. I'm glad I'm not building my computer for a few months. Got plenty of time to think stuff over.

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  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by Christopher View Post
    Can I come over to your house and drool? I'll bring a bib.

    Sure, just bring some beer. I'll make nachos!

  21. Likes Christopher likes this post
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    The settings difference is explained by AMD... Apparently its because the 1080 isn't doing its job properly and the 480's are...

    The elephant in the room:
    Ashes uses procedural generation based on a randomized seed at launch. The benchmark does look slightly different every time it is run. But that, many have noted, does not fully explain the quality difference people noticed.
    At present the GTX 1080 is incorrectly executing the terrain shaders responsible for populating the environment with the appropriate amount of snow. The GTX 1080 is doing less work to render AOTS than it otherwise would if the shader were being run properly. Snow is somewhat flat and boring in color compared to shiny rocks, which gives the illusion that less is being rendered, but this is an incorrect interpretation of how the terrain shaders are functioning in this title.
    The content being rendered by the RX 480--the one with greater snow coverage in the side-by-side (the left in these images)--is the correct execution of the terrain shaders.
    So, even with fudgy image quality on the GTX 1080 that could improve their performance a few percent, dual RX 480 still came out ahead.
    As a parting note, I will mention we ran this test 10x prior to going on-stage to confirm the performance delta was accurate. Moving up to 1440p at the same settings maintains the same performance delta within +/-1%.
    Source: Click

    Still wonna see this thing tested on more than one game though.

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    I really don't believe in anything from the mouths of the companies themselves (NVIDIA or AMD). I'll wait for real-world tests.

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    Wait for TekSyndicate to get their hands on it for real-world benchmarking and unbiased review.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Nerevar View Post
    Wait for TekSyndicate to get their hands on it for real-world benchmarking and unbiased review.
    Yes, they're always reliable.


    Also, dual-GPU setups have always been wonky at best. I don't feel like hopping on that train again.

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