Latest PSU headlines:

Page 1 of 146 111 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 25 of 3638
  1. #1
    Forum Sage

    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Posts
    7,759
    Rep Power
    79
    Points
    99 (0 Banked)
    Technology
    • Ask a Question



    This thread is designed to allow new members and the not so new to ask simple technology related questions without creating a new thread. So please, use this when you have a simple question and the other members should try to answer as best as they can.

    Rules[reveal]
    1. Please be kind to all members.
    2. If you don't have anything helpful to contribute, just view please.
    3. Don't bad mouth people who may lack knowledge on a certain subject. Not everyone is l33t as you think you are.
    4. And always try to quote the question so we can understand what your answer is pointed to.
    5. Just be a good person, simple as that.
    6. Please use the Search feature first and try Google, if nothing comes up, ask.
    [/reveal]

    So if you have any questions, please ask away.



    (updated Feb. 28th 2008, added Video Processing and Receiver Classification)






    Please keep in mind that this is a "work in progress".... I have added a few more bits of information to make this a bit more complete, I have much more I'm planning on adding in the near future. My goal was been reached for helping people with this topic, and I really hope it keeps going!

    HDTV, Blu-ray and HD DVD, Surround Sound, Recievers, PS3 Video and Audio TOPIC and FAQ!



    This is the official topic of all things HD! Please ask any questions and much like the "Ask a Question" Topic in the main forums I would love it if people could help answer questions so we can keep this topic going and hopefully it will help clean up some clutter in the forums.

    In the next week or so I will be cleaning up this original post and making it organized into Catagories, my goal is to have a wealth of information to better educate and service all the great members of this forum. By no means should this be considered FINAL, it will always grow - much like technology. Also it should be noted that I would love help from anyone who has things to add or thinks something should be changed or added.

    THE BASICS FAQ:

    01. What are the HDTV Resolutions and what is Native Resolution?
    720p, 1080i and 1080p. There are actually a few variants of 720p, some LCD screens are actually 768 or some other number, this is still basically considered 720p. 720p (720x1280) = 921'600 pixels. 1080i/p (1080x1920) = 2'073'600 pixels. Native resolution is the "fixed" amount of pixels your HDTV has. Many HDTVs can accept all different HD signals but are actually only ever displaying one resolution, if the input is higher than the TVs native resolution then it is downscaled. If it is lower than youd native resolution then it is upscaled. There is more about that below in the Connectiviy and How it works FAQ.

    02. What do the "i" and "p" stand for?
    "i" stands for Interlaced and "p" stands for progressive.
    Progressive scan video is scanned from side to side, top to bottom: line 1, line 2, line 3 etc, up to the end of the frame. It's as simple as that. Interlaced video is scanned from side to side, top to bottom, as well. The difference is that every 60th of a second, every other line making up the complete frame is scanned. Then, a 60th of a second later, the lines in-between the lines that have already appeared are scanned. Effectively, half the picture's vertical resolution is sent in the first 30th of a second, and the second half is sent in the second 30th of a second. When the video is played back, the whole thing happens in reverse, giving the appearance of a complete frame. Each of these "halves" of a frame is called a "field."

    03. What types of HDTV technology are there?
    There are many types of HDTV technology, all of them have their pros and cons. CRT is what has been the standard since TVs started, LCD and Plasma were next in line, since then we have DILA, SXRD/LCoS, DLP and they are working on something new now called SED (although this will not be available for quite a while yet). It should be noted that SOME high-end Front Projection HDTVs use line doublers that scan the field every 1/60th insteand of 1/30th like almost all HDTVS currently out there.

    04. What is the difference between flat panels, rear projection and front projection?
    Flat panels or "direct view" HDTVs use an array grid the size of the actual TV to display the images, unlike a rear projection HDTV that uses a small grid to display a much larger image. Front Projectors do a similar process except the image is shot out in "front" and you need a screen to display it on.

    05. What does Contrast Ratio mean for me and why?
    Contrast Ratio is the difference between the whitest white and the darkest black colors the display can show. The greater the contrast, the better the screen and the subtlety of colors it can display.

    06. What is Response Time and what does it mean?

    Response time is the amount of time a pixel in a monitor takes to go from active (black) to inactive (white) and back to active (black) again. It is measured in millisecond (ms). Lower numbers
    mean faster transitions and therefore fewer visible image artifacts. Typically you want something under 8ms, but the lower the better - 4ms and 2.5ms are becoming common now for some types of Displays (Expensive LCDs and SXRD/LCoS).

    07. What is "Ghosting"?
    The term "ghosting" comes from a light trail that is left behind fast moving objects on a HDTV screen, this is more a problem of the past but is due to bad response times on HDTV screens. It was mostly associated with LCD - because for quite a while LCD screens typically had much worse response times than other TV technologies. But things have changed, still to this day though some cheaper HDTVs have bad response times and this effects them. Even televisions with 8ms response time can fall prey to this problem. After reading the question above this one about Response Time it should be clear as to what is going on. The fast moving object moves across the screen and the HDTV has a problem creating that image properly without the trails or "ghosting" behind it. Basically the HDTV "cannot keep up". Colours cannot be turned on, turned off and turned on again fast enough - and leave a trail effect.

    08. Do I need a 50"+ HDTV to see the difference between 720p and 1080p?
    NO. The simple answer is NO. You can see the difference that 1080p makes with ANY screen size. The reason being is that your eyes and brain can only take in so much visual information. When choosing a HDTV it is essential to pick the right size or you may be missing out on some detail. If you sit too close or too far away from any given HDTV size you are under or oversaturating your brain with visual information. For a 50" 1080p HDTV you need to sit at around 6.5 to 7.5ft to get the most out of your resolution, otherwise youll be out of range or too close and the image will either start to lose its smooth "HD" look (too close) or blend together and youll miss out on fine detail (too far away). Same goes with any size of HDTV, for smaller sizes the same holds true. If you have a 40" HDTV that is 1080p you just need to sit closer! Same goes with even smaller..... and ofcourse bigger. Some are suprised to find out that for HDTVs as big as 60" you need to sit as close as 8ft to get the most out of 1080p. This is nothing new and is based purely on principals found in science and math. You can use this link to determine seating distance relative to screen width:http://www.myhometheater.homestead.c...alculator.html

    09. What is gaming lag?
    Gaming lag is when the HDTV does its extra processing to the iamge and causes a delay in the reactions to the image. Most HDTVs shouldnt have this problem, although some still do. Almost all HDTVs have something called "Game Mode" that turns off most of the extra processing and directs the signal through the display with little extra work - basically it takes out the lag by taking out the extra work that caused it in the first place.

    10. What benefits does HDMI 1.3 really have, in translation to basic terms... and do I need it - or should I want it?

    (I have answered this question in more detail for the Surround Sound aspects of HDMI in the Audio Section below). The answer isnt so simple, it could be anything from YES, NO or MAYBE... depending on who you are and what you have in your setup. Starting with the basics, HDMI 1.3 allows for more colour to be sent to the TV, and allows for TrueHD and Uncompressed Sound (PCM) to be sent Bitstream or "zipped" to the recievers. (More about that in the Audio section!) These features arent too great of a leap as they would like you to believe for 2 main reasons. The first being testing showing "deep colour" off of HDMI 1.3 against HDMI 1.2 was conducted with pictures and videos and the difference isnt exactly immediate at all. The second reason is that to get TrueHD and Uncompressed PCM Sound you do NOT need HDMI 1.3! HDMI 1.2 and previous versions allow this too! Most devices decode the sound first before sending it, so you dont need to actually send it "zipped". HDMI 1.3 is great, but 1.2 will do you just as well in almost all cases. You get great picture and the sound is identical in almost all cases.

    11. What is the RGB Full Mode that was put into place with the latest 1.8 Firmware update?
    For a full walkthrough on this subject please refer to this link that I Started:
    http://www.ps3forums.com/showthread.php?t=75181


    12. The Ins and Outs of Video Upscaling:
    http://www.electronichouse.com/article/video_upscalers/

    The Ins and Outs of Video Upscalers
    Unquestionably the hardest working and most ignored component, video upscalers play a big role in your home theater.

    February 26, 2008 | by Francis Vale

    A scaler sounds like some sci-fi creepy critter. But in the video world, scalers are good things. By definition, a video scaler converts one resolution to another, say converting a standard 480P DVD output (860x480 pixels) for display on a native 720P HDTV set (1280x720 pixels).

    But How?
    There is no magic here. When a scaler converts a 480P signal to 720P, the video is not suddenly transformed into hi-def. The scaler simply adds additional lines by filling in the blanks, as it were. Thus, the software and hardware inside the scaler that’s making these educated guesses about how to draw the picture is crucial, and it’s what differentiates the great scalers from the just OK variety.

    Hi-def 1080i (1920x540 pixels) is transmitted as two separate 540 frames using a technique called interlacing. Your brain is tricked into seeing the two frames as a single image on a 1080i-capable HDTV. So what happens when you feed a native 720P HDTV a 1080i signal? Its internal scaler converts (and its video processor deinterlaces) the 1080i-interlaced signal into an all at once displayed 720P.

    If the transmitted signal is 1080P (1920x1080 pixels), where the video is transmitted all at once as a single frame, the native 720P resolution set will similarly convert the 1080P signal to 720P. Ditto for converting 1080i to native 1080P, and vice versa. But going from 1080i to native 1080P is not scaling; it’s just de-interlacing, whereby the two 1920x540 pixel frames are stitched together and displayed as one big 1920x1080 pixel frame. If the 1080P set correctly deinterlaces the two separately sent 1920x540 pixel frames, no information is lost. You’ve got full 1080P.

    Fresh Start
    Toss out the words “upconvert” and “downconvert” from your mental schema. These loaded terms imply that “downconverting” a greater pixel count signal to run on a lower native resolution HDTV produces a worse picture than “upconverting” a lower pixel count signal for a higher native resolution HDTV. Rubbish. It’s all just converting signals, and there is also no free lunch. If the information is not in the original signal, then it’s not going to be found. Period. But you can fake the brain out by adding more information in the form of additional lines of interpolated video, like a 1080P native set converting a 480P signal.

    Note to gamers: Say you just bought a native 1080i or 720P HDTV and you hook up a last generation Xbox running a game that can output 480P, 720P or 1080i, what happens? Maybe you get a munged picture? You need the Xbox HD AV pack (20 bucks) for enabling a widescreen (16:9) ratio while displaying in 480p, 720p, or 1080i mode. And note that you may have to manually adjust your television to fit the Xbox display to the shape of the screen. At the time the Xbox video game system was originally developed, there was not an established standard for alerting a monitor to a 480p wide-screen mode switch.

    The Pixel Myth
    But let’s get back to scalers. Hi-def picture quality is much less dependent on a set’s native pixel count that you have been led to believe. Case in point, the fabulous new line of Pioneer “Kuro” plasma HDTV’s. The Pioneer PDP-5080 HD has a native resolution of 1365 x 768 pixels, which is much lower than 1080P (1920x1080 pixel) sets. It also means that this Pioneer plasma set is resizing (scaling) every one of the standard high def signals, 720P, 1080i and 1080P. But to see this plasma set is to be blown away by its picture quality. This is due primarily to two factors: it’s incredibly deep blacks and its very good scaling and video processing electronics.

    The takeaway here is that you can get great looking hi-def video with HDTV’s that are much less than 1080P native, the supposed gold standard. This is especially true if the HDTV is 50” or less in size and you sit at normal viewing distances from the set. If the HDTV has great native picture quality to begin with, like the Pioneer Kuro plasma’s, and it also has good scaling (and de-interlacing), you are home free.

    Adding a Scaler
    The thing is, though, most sets, even the Pioneer Kuro’s, can benefit from great 3rd party scalers. Outboard scalers can also do high quality de-interlacing and eliminate or minimize “jaggies” and other motion artifacts that can occur with lesser deinterlacers. Good scalers will also correct for A/V lipsync, improve your connectivity and source switching options, and enable the use of anamorphic lenses if you use a rear projector. (An anamorphic lens is typically used to convert a full 4:3 native format into a 16:9 widescreen format, giving a true home theater experience.) An outboard scaler can also allow you to properly calibrate your picture.

    A great scaler for a true high-end home theater setup is the $6,000 (list) Faroudja DVP1080 HD Digital Video Processor. It’s big bucks, but you truly get what you pay for with the Faroudja. This company is the granddaddy of video processing and they really know their stuff.

    For about half the price of the mighty Faroudja, check out the new DVDO iScan VP50Pro from Anchor Bay. It’s the first scaler in the world to get THX certification and be HDMI 1.3 compliant. It’s also the first DVDO product to have all of their VRS (Video Reference Series) technologies in one box. It lists for $3149. If you are into serious home theater it’s worth every penny.

    But for a more “real world” price of around $450 you can still get a socko scaler, like the Gefen Home Theater Scaler Plus. Gefen’s scalers are cost-effective solutions that allow different video formats to be integrated and output up to 1080p resolutions. Gefen’s Scalers are not high-end video processing scalers like the Faroudja and the Anchor Bay units. But the Gefen scalers are still very convenient tools that enable you to integrate, access and tweak your video with very good results. They also feature dual 3D motion video adaptive de-interlacers, auto 3:2 pulldown, proprietary color enhancement engines, on-screen menu systems, and full HDCP compliance. The Gefen scaler is capable of switching between a variety of connected devices.

    USING YOUR HDTV (Connectivity, How it Works):

    01. What types of connections exist for HD on HDTV?
    You can hook up HD devices such as the PS3, HD DVD Players, HD Cable boxes etc. etc. using 2 different types of HD connection. Component cables (green, blue and red) which do not carry audio, and HDMI - and in come cases DVI to HDMI cords (these are HDMI connections on one end and HDMI connections on the other, they carry an HDMI signal, but unlike HDMI it does not carry audio). For many people out there VGA is a concern and a bonus, heres why: VGA can easily support 1080p! But the problem is that SOME HDTVS do not support their full native resolution via VGA. Many do, but it should be something you look into if it concerns you and you plan on using VGA connectors.

    02. Which connection is the best for me?
    Tha answer is not cut and dry: It depends. It depends for a few reasons, mainly today though the answer is more and more becoming one thing: HDMI. Componenet is very good but it is analog and cannot fully carry 1080p with 60fps (which pretty much all 1080p HDTVs need). When connecting with Component the signal is first outputted in digital, then it is converted into analog, then back into digital again once it reaches your HDTV. This connection can lose some slight amounts of quality along the way, usually the difference is not totally noticeable, but it is there and some people on some HDTVs can see a clear difference in image quality. HDMI has much higher bandwidths and is digital. TV manufacterers and HD DVD and Blu-Ray device makers still incorperate Component but are pretty much setting their sights on HDMI. Advanced sound codecs and higher quality picture are all advantages of HDMI. In the end the answer is still: It depends, but it is also simple, if you have HDMI input, USE IT.

    03. What about using other non-HDTV connections on your HDTV?
    You can still use Composite (red, white and yellow) on your HDTV but it will look quite bad. This is because the image that your HDTV is recieving is not HD since the ability of Composite is levelled off at DVD/SD Quality. Your HDTV has to do lots of extra processing to the image to stretch and fill out the spaces with colour and content that it "guesses". Many HDTVs can do this well, and many can do it quite poorly. If watching SD-DVDS (regular DVDs) or regular non-HD stuff on your HDTV then make sure to find out how well it does this. Basically in the end its not reccomended. If your using DVD players, atleast use Component/HDMI connections on the newer upscaling models to assist the television in this process.

    04. What is 3:2 Pulldown and what does it do?
    The process of converting 24 frame/s material to 29.97 frame/s is known as 3:2 pulldown. The term "pulldown" comes from the mechanical process of "pulling" the film down to advance it from one frame to the next at a repetitive rate (nominally 24 fps). This is accomplished in two steps. The first step is to slow down the film motion by 0.1%. This speed change is unnoticeable to the viewer, and makes the film travel at 23.976 frame/s. The "3:2 pulldown" telecine process creates a slight error in the video signal compared to the original film frames that can be seen in the above image. This is one reason why NTSC films viewed on typical home equipment may not appear as smooth as when viewed in a cinema. The phenomenon is particularly apparent during slow, steady camera movements which appear slightly jerky when telecined. This process is commonly referred to as telecine judder.

    05. What is deinterlacing?
    Deinterlacing is the process of converting interlaced video (a sequence of fields) into a non-interlaced form (a sequence of frames). This is a fundamentally impossible process that must always produce some image degradation, since it ideally requires "temporal interpolation" which involves guessing the movement of every object in the image and applying motion correction to every object. There are two basic methods of deinterlacing: combination, where the even and odd frames are combined into one image and then displayed, and extension, where each frame (with only half the lines) is extended to the entire screen.

    06. What is upscaling?

    A function your HDTV preforms called "scaling", Upscaling is a process that mathematically matches the pixel count of the output of a standard or non-hi-def signal (such as standard DVD) to the physical pixel count on an HDTV, which is typically 1280x720 (720p)1920x1080 (1080i/p). This does a higher quality job of "guessing" the colours and visual information needed to be placed into an image that is going to be displayed on a wider pixel grid, resulting in better detail and color consistency.

    07. What is downscaling?

    A function your HDTV preforms called "scaling", Downscaling is basically the reverse of upscaling (ofcourse). It has to take information out of the signal/image to create a consistant look that cloesly matches the original source. Examples would be watching 1080i content on a 720p HDTV that accepts 1080i (many do). The visual information is greater than the TVs native resolution and certain bits of information must be taken out of the signal to work properly on lower resolution screens.

    08. HDCP, what is it and what does it mean for me?

    High Bandwidth Digital Content Protection (or HDCP) is a form of Digital Rights Managment set up by the Intel Corporation. In the most basic terms it is a Liscenced way to control Digital content, used mostly now for Blu-ray and HD DVD discs (and HD-gaming).
    All digital sources must now encrypt signals before outputting them as digital signals. This also means that all video displays must be "HDCP enabled" to decode incoming digital signals, otherwise they can't display the images. This is very important if you have purchased a video display. Even today, many front projectors aren't HDCP compatible, which means that you can't use their digital inputs to watch a digital video signal. This is a hot topic of debate for some people.... but the truth is, its here to stay. It can also enable content providers to put restrictions on some content, for example they could allow you to view the material but there would be a limitation on the resolution, so if for example you tried to watch something that was 1080p via a non-HDCP device it would downgrade the resolution output to something MUCH lower. Watchable, but not HD. This is another reason why almost ALL HDTVS cannot accept 1080p via Component Cables.


    CALIBRATION, and HDTV Buying Guide:

    01. What is Calibration and why should I do it or have it done?
    Calibration is basically "tweaking" or altering the settings of your HDTV to produce realistic whites, blacks, greyscale tracking, brightness.. etc. There are 2 kinds of Calibration, the "do it yourself" type which you need a Calibration disc such as AVIA or DVE, or the proffesional type which is done by a ISF Calibrator and can cost anywhere from 250 to 500 dollars depending on who is doing it and what they do. The basic idea of Calibration is based on the idea that you want to find the ideal "grey". All TVs mix the 3 primary colours to produce the colour grey - so if you can find the perfect grey and test for this you can get colours the way they are supposed to look. The way that you can "do it yourself" is with the Calibration discs mentioned earlier, you play them on your TV and it will give you test patterns of all types and explain to you what you are supposed to be seeing or not seeing, and you fiddle with certain aspects of your HDTVs controls to obtain the hopeful results. This can produce great results that are immediate to anyone from the amatuer to the enthusiast. ISF (Imaging Science Foundation) Calibration is similar in some ways, but they use expensive equipment (some of it can be upwards of 5'000 to 14'000 dollars!) to find the perfect grey colour on your HDTV. It takes a few hours to do this and they adjust many other things too. Often times your HDTV has black levels too black (called "crushed blacks), what this means is that the black levels are too dark and they crush detail in shadows and other darker scenes. The colour white in HDTVs has blue inserted into them to give them a "whiter than white" look to them, this is because of the way the human eyes precieves certain colours. It produces fake looking whites that are completly wrong. You cannot fix most of these things without going into the service menu (WARNING: do not acess service menus unless you know EXACTLY what you are doing) - the service menus are very complicated and consist of programming code and have areas where you can actually write things to the programming of your HDTV, if your not careful you can ruin your HDTV this way. You can also control things that you simply cannot do in the regular menus. In the end ISF Calibration will leave you with a whole new HDTV than the one you bought, its a night and day difference.


    02. How big of a TV do I need and what is "proper seating distance" all about?

    It depends on a few things. Budget and room size are the main factors along with how close you sit to the HDTV or how close youd like to or not like to sit rather. To get the most out of your HDTV resolution wise you should be sitting in the "sweet spot", it is a certain distance from the screen where you can sit and resolve all the line of resolution without being too close or too far. You can find more about that specificaly above in this FAQ in "THE BASICS" section at the top. Seating distance is key, because you could potentially be paying money for something you will not be actually using properly. If you sit too far away or too close to ANY resolution of HDTV you are missing out on that actual resolution. You really have to decide what quality of HDTV you want and how big you can actually have. Its a matter of opinion ofcourse, but the idea of sitting too close or too far away is not opinion, its a fact. Ofcourse you could sit too far or too close but that would defeat the purpose of getting a HDTV. Budgetting for a HDTV can be difficult for some people, higher end larger models can be very expensive. If youd like a good HDTV for cheaper, check out later models from makers. Check out review sites like Cnet.com that do reviews to check things out for yourself on specific HDTVs, later models are all there too.

    03. What should I be looking for in a HDTV? And what are the factors that I should consider when buying a new HDTV?
    This is a big question. I will try to make it short and sweet, it is based mostly on things I have written about above in the FAQ. Size - what size do you want and how big is the room you are sitting in? Also how close are you sitting?? Contrast is important, the higher the number the better. Anything above 3000 is fine, it might look fine to the untrained eye anyway, this is a matter of opinion to some as they can easily not tell the difference or are indifferent about "looking the other way" on the subject. Response time, this is a big deal for gamers - the reason bad response times can be extra annoying to people who play games, you should be looking for a response time of ATLEAST 8ms, the lower the better. Checking out to see if your new potential HDTV suffers from gaming lag is another big thing for gamers, there is a description of gaming lag in "THE BASICS" section at the top of this FAQ - basically you want to stay away from sets that have this. Another big factor is lighting conditions. How dark is the room you watch your HDTV in? Is it light most of the time? The main question here is what is it mostly like for you? If its dark then youd like a brighter screen, perhaps looking at HDTVs with brighter bubls or techonlogy. There are many factors and you really have to think about them before you spend your money.

    04. More on Calibration please!
    Ok.... here is something I wrote for someone in another topic but deserves to be here too...ISF Calibration is like the ultimate thing you can do to any TV or projector. It involves a technician to come to your house with a bunch of equipment and a laptop. He/She will run a series of tests on your TV using your PS3 and/or DVD/HD DVD/Blu-ray (whatever) player. They do all sorts of things. And it can get very complicated.

    Basically your TV should be operating within a certain output of light for each color, and this amount is NEVER correct from the factory - ever. This is only the first step, the basic idea of the color accuracy is to find "the perfect gray", basically the color gray is a perfect combination of the primary colors. If you can adjust through the service menu (its a complicated command code line similar to HTML in the way that if you don't know how to read and navigate it then your screwed) the properties that control color then you can achieve the perfect gray, therefore you are achieving the perfect output of all the primary colors that is as close to real life as it can get, since HDTV cannot show the immense gambit of color that exists in real life this is important for giving you the best possible.

    Once this starts he will be going through colors with light/color reading instruments to determine the best gray combination possible. After a while it will be found, then they will proceed to change the black levels on your set, getting the full shadow detail possible. What is going on is basically when TVs leave the factory and the store they come to you totally out of whack even though it still looks great. He popped in Batman Begins on HD DVD, there is a scene where young Bruce falls down a well, when you play it in slow motion (or even regular speed) you can see the fine detail in the bricks of the well, but when he changed the settings after many tests you could see FAR more detail in the bricks where his shadow is. This is because he altered the black level on the TV, before what was happening was something called "black crush" its when the black levels are far too strong and they "crush" out detail by being significantly too dark when they SHOULD NOT BE. So that is a good step as well, very important.

    He does it with white levels too. If you are watching or playing a movie or game with lots of bright lights sometimes you could be missing out on detail and picture quality because the white levels are far too high. Same as black crush, this is basically "white crush".

    In the process you will find out that your TV was probably "pushing" a color too much. What this means is that your TV was putting out too much of one color, often times it is red. In any case it doesn't matter what the color is that is being pushed, it is too much, over saturated and will give a unnatural effect (most often you cannot even tell until after the changes he has done occur) which is not pleasing.

    Amongst other things, it is good to note that the ISF Calibrator will take the blue out of your whites ... the "whiter than white" that all HDTVs have. Let me explain....
    ALL HDTVS have the color blue put into their whites, it is NOT something that you can change, but the ISF Calibrator can. Why do they do this? The TV companies know that people want things to look "good" regardless of why or what for. But this is merely an illusion, think of this example..... laundry detergent has often marketed "whiter than white socks!" but this it simply not true, there is no such thing as "whiter than white", the trick here is that the human eye picks up blue stronger than white and when a bit of blue is added with white your brain is literally being tricked into thinking that it is more white than it really is. But it is actually blueish white. This is false and once you have seen the difference you will never want to go back, true white is accurate and really makes a big difference the first time you see it. For example, when I see other people's HDTVs, even in pictures on the forums I instantly see this problem, every single time. Same with other colors.


    Some of the final things that will happen is he will test the edge enhancement and the noise control and various other processing abilities that your TV is capable of (but most end up getting turned off!). Many people put their "edge enhancer" on to 100 or rather put it to FULL or very high. THIS IS FALSE!!! All it does is literally add information to the picture that was NEVER THERE TO BEGIN WITH! It makes it worse and can add artifacts to your picture, this... is not good. Same with many other things that generally go in the CUSTOM menu in most HDTVs. These extra processing abilities only usually add information to the image that was not meant to be there. For example, my EDGE ENHANCEMENT is literally at 0 and my TV is sharper than most. LONG story short.... its in the eye of the beholder.... to me and my girlfriend (and even my parents who came to my place after I had the calibration) the difference was IMMEDIATE and it was SUPERIOR to anything that we saw before hand.

    More real world examples.... Movies.... no matter what format it is on, they have colors. Take Coke a Cola can... RED right? Well in real life that Coke can is far more "Red" than you can see on Film, Blu-ray/HD DVD or your HDTV which is not capable of showing you that many true colors. Now, if we take that example... ISF Calibration makes your TV show you the absolute most accurate colors possible, which is VASTLY different than what you were getting before the calibration. Now you may think its just a Coke can... but this applies to EVERYTHING.... every single color, even black on your screen. So the ramifications are huge.

    This is a long explanation but honestly, it is in a nutshell compared to what goes on.


    HD DVD, Blu-ray and HD Broadcasting:

    01. Why HD DVD and/or Blu-ray?
    HD DVD and Blu-ray take full advantage of your HDTV, all HD DVDs and Blu-ray discs are encoded in 1080p and some of them even have newer levels of high quality sound (this is covered in the Audio Section in more detail). The amount of colour that HDTVs can reproduce is higher than regular style TVs, with High Defenition discs you get greater colour, greater depth of field and much more clarity and detail. Rugalar DVDs (SD-DVDs) and VHS were created with the old 4:3 TVs in mind with their much lower "non HD" resolutions. The next generation of movie discs are here and some of them are simply stunning. Not all are high quality, many are not much better than their SD-DVD counterparts. But most are higher quality, and with time more and more will look better. For a comprehensive look at a always growing list of organized and ranked titles according to Picture Quality please check these links: HD DVD Tier System and the Blu-ray Tier System.
    Both lists are updated constantly and are voted in as well - they are essential for any early adopter!

    02. What is "HD Lite" and why does my HD Cable or Satellite Dish look worse than it should?
    The term "HD Lite" refers to low quality HD Cable/Satellite Dish signals. At the moment there is not a single Cable or Dish provider that sends the signal at the compression quality of HD DVDs or Blu-ray discs. In fact the amount of compression that Cable/Dish companies use is far beyond what it should be, hence the term "HD Lite". The reason for this is that the amount of bandwidth needed to pass these signals to your HDTV is just not available to the companies - so they have to use a complicated process of compressing the signal so that it can initially be sent, then split and sent to all the homes with cable/dish. With these levels of compression it will likely be a long time before this problem is solved. The best way to get HD material is through the air waves with an antenna! Not everyone can do this though. The amount of compression is sometimes worse than other stations, but almost all the time things such as macroblocking will happen. (Macroblocking is when the frames in the picture move too quickly - information is needed to quickly fill the image - and the signal cannot provide the information quickly enough and small to large blocks appear in the image). Other problems lay in general quality, it will never be as sharp/crisp or detailed as a good clean source like HD DVD or Blu-ray or PS3/Xbox 360.

    03. What should I know about HD DVD and Blu-ray, players, techonlogy and application, firmware updates and what they do?

    There isnt too much to know about HD DVD and Blu-ray formats if your simply interested in watching the films. If you would like to know more about how they work then the next question down in this section will help you. Right now on the market there are a few Blu-ray players and even fewer HD DVD players (including the 360 add on), some players do not fully output 1080p, but 1080i. The Toshiba HD-A1 and the Toshiba HD-A2 output a max of 1080i via HDMI. The Toshiba X-1 and X-2 output 1080p via HDMI. BUT.... it must be known that if you own a 1080p HDTV then the difference between 1080i and 1080p is almost impossible to tell, and with HD DVDs or Blu-ray discs its pretty much impossible to tell because of the frame rates and the fact that all the information is there within 1080i and it is originally encoded in 1080p to begin with, the information is sent to your HDTV and it "weaves" the pattern back together to display a full 1080p image. Most people are content with the A-1 or A-2 models of HD DVD players because of this reason. Blu-ray players almost always output 1080p - various companies make them including Sony, Samsung and Pioneer, Panasonic and Philips. More companies are coming out with Blu-ray players sometime in 2007. You will want to use HDMI in this case for 2 main reasons, HDMI can carry full 1080p signal with 60fps and its the best quality for the time being (probably for years to come), and HDMI can carry TrueHD and Uncompressed PCM Sound from HD DVD and Blu-ray discs. You can easily use Component cables as well, they will do just fine if your HDTV has no HDMI inputs. Ideally you would like to be using a HDMI Surround Sound reciever to plug your HDMI in and then have it going OUT to the TV so you can access the higher quality sound, but this is not needed at all to enjoy HD DVD or Blu-ray!! Just like the PS3, HD DVD and Blu-ray players have firmware updates now and then. They exist for the same reasons.... to add features and fix problems that may exist or were over looked previously. Often times they can even enhance preformance!


    04. What are the real differences between HD DVD and Blu-ray?
    HD DVD and Blu-ray, basically are the same thing. At first people who didn't really know much about it assumed that they were totally different because they used different compression methods to store the data on the discs, but quickly things changed over the months. They could always use the same types of compression like MPEG and VC-1, some are better than others for different situations. Both formats can hold any extra info the other ones can as well, such as exact same audio codecs such as TrueHD and Uncompressed PCM, basically its the same thing. The true difference between the two is content, as most consumers know by now. A lot of films on one format are not available on the other, and vice versa. Thats because studios (the companies that own and create these movies) control them, and some decide to release movies either only on 1 format, or on both. Some pick Blu-ray, some pick HD DVD and many pick both.


    05. Some HD DVD players output 1080i/720p but not 1080p, why is that? And is that worse than 1080p on my 1080p set?
    NO. The original source material being 1080p on the HD DVDs or Blu-ray discs is being translated into 1080i across the HDMI cable - if you have a 1080p HDTV then 1080i coming into it is going to look identical to 1080p, especially if it comes from an actual 1080p source like these discs. 1080p HDTVs weave the signal back together, all the 1080 information is there, 1080x1920..... if you have a 1080p HDTV it wont matter if its interlaced (i) or progressive (p) as long as the original source is 1080p. Even GOOD 1080i sources are negligible with the right HDTV. If you HDTV can accept 1080p then by all means do it. The odd case (if you own the HD DVD players by Toshiba, their two lower models the A1 and the A2 output 1080i while the X1 and the X2 output 1080p) of the players is not a problem for 1080p owners.

    Audio Section (Recievers, TrueHD, LPCM, DTS:MA, Surround Sound, etc.):


    01. What are the new types of sound that have come along with the HD DVDs and Blu-ray/PS3?

    Along with the regular stuff we have all been used to over the years - we have new High Defenition sound types to go with HD DVD and Blu-ray. Now we have room on our discs to house true 7.1 channels and beyond. Not just taking 5.1 and splitting the back two channels, ofcourse this is mainly how things will be done for sometime still as most movies were only meant for 5.1, and while this is still great - the possibilities go beyond that. The two main things to look for, for "next-gen sound" are TrueHD and Uncompressed PCM tracks on Blu-ray/HD DVD. Much like DVD these are surroun sound formats, except these are not compressed nearly as much - therefore being much closer to the original sound stage set by the people who made the movie. The sound is crisper, cleaner and much higher quality. To utilize these sounds you need a Reciever capable of taking in HDMI. There are many on the market, they are usually more expensive than other recievers. But if sound is something you enjoy a lot... then it is worth it to look into HDMI recievers.

    02. How do I utilize these new sound types?
    The only way to use True HD and Umcompressed (lossless) PCM off of HD DVDs and Blu-ray discs is to use a HDMI reciever - this way you can pass the HDMI into the reciever and then back out to your HDTV. These powerful recievers allow the higher quality uncompressed sound that are much closer to the original sound from the movie to be passed in and used properly. If you do not have a HDMI reciever or do not plan on getting one any time soon - you are out of luck for TrueHD or PCM sound for now. The 5.1 channel sound programs on the HD DVDs and Blu-ray discs will still sound great, but they are not the High Defenition sound encoded on some of the discs.

    03. Do I need to wait for HDMI 1.3 to utilize TrueHD or Uncompressed sound off of HD DVD or Blu-ray?
    The answer is: NO, and MAYBE. Heres why... 1.3 only true benefit in the sound department over 1.2 is that it allows you to send TrueHD and Uncompressed sound "zipped" or Bitstream to the reciever to decode and use. Most devices on the market today and in the future (like the HD DVD players and the PS3/Blu-ray Players) decode the signal INSIDE the actual unit before sending it to the reciever! So this means that you do not need HDMI 1.3 and your getting the BEST sound available today and probably for many years to come. So the answer is NO because if you already have a 1.2 HDMI reciever and have next-gen disc player that decodes the signal its self then you dont need it at all. The answer is MAYBE because not everyone has HDMI recievers, and might not have a device that decodes the signals for them. It should also be noted that there are no 1.3 recievers out there right now, but soon they will exist. They will be considered "flag ship" units and cost more than usual.


    04. What type of reciever should I be looking at for general purpose or HD DVD and Blu-ray/PS3?

    With many answers around here... It depends on your sitaution and what you woule like out of your set up. There are a few types of reciever in this situation, First: HDMI recievers that pass 1080p visual signals and can accept TrueHD and other Uncompressed MPCM from HD DVD and Blu-ray/PS3 gaming. Second: HDMI recievers that cannot pass 1080p video signals but can handle next-gen sounds, Third: HDMI recievers that cannot handle either the HD signal nor the next-gen sound, and Fourth: Any reciever that accepts optical signals from your PS3 will do you just fine for 5.1 set ups! Utilizing all the audio formats youve come to know that go along with DVD, but now for Blu-ray and HD DVD. If your looking for HDMI recievers, make sure to take note which of them can accept, pass and work with 1080p signals (if you need 1080p) or other HD signals visually, and can handle TrueHD, Uncompressed MPCM and other Lossless audio from movies and games. Not all HDMI models can do this, so youd better check first.

    05. How do I set up my surround sound and what types of set ups are there? (5.1, 6.1 and 7.1)
    There are 3 basic surround sound types, 5.1, 6.1 and 7.1. There are other hardcore versions of these with extra speakers (presence) to fill the room in larger home theater designs. But we will not get into that. The key thing to remember is that you need to set it up properly to create a proper sound field, if you fail to set it up properly the sound field will have pockets or holes in it that ruin the effect of being surrounded... by sound! You need to take measurements and make sure you dial in the distances (put information into receiver when setting up) between your main seating position and the speaker its self. The more speakers you add to your system, the more precise and accurate you will have to be. For instance setting up a 5.1 isn't too bad and take a bit of time, but setting up a 7.1 get a bit more tricky because you want there to be enough room behind you to have the speakers set properly. The measurements must be done properly and you need certain speakers certain specific distances away from each other to create the best possible sound field. The trickiest part for people is always the rear speakers, for a good 5.1 you want them beside/behind you, on a good angle. This is not too hard to do as long as you keep it in check. 6.1 is easy, once you figure out the 5.1 you place your 6.1 extra speaker in the middle of the two rears. 7.1 gets a bit trickier because you need to have the 2 rears from 5.1 with extra Surround Backs.... for 7.1, you want them about 1.2 times the distance that you are from them on your couch, so measure the distance from your couch or whatever - to the wall or exact line on the floor or whatever where they will be standing and multiply that by 1.2 and you have the exact distance the 2 back surrounds need to be from each other. Simple, but it takes time.

    06. What do the terms Bitstream and MPCM mean and what do they mean in the real world to me?
    Bitstream is just a basic term to describe the audio coming from your dvd player, hd dvd, blu-ray or ps3 machines.... its used to describe the audio when its being "zipped" or packed up for the receiver to un pack or un zip. Thats basically it. MPCM is a basic term to describe multichannel (surround sound) uncompressed sound, thats basically it - I could go further into it, but won't at this time since id rarely comes up what it is actually doing. MPCM exists for example on the PS3 game Resistance: Fall of Man, 7.1 MPCM.... it sounds great and for a reason, its true 7.1 and its uncompressed sound.

    07. What should I use for Audio on my PS3 if I have a HDMI reciever?

    If you choose PCM in the PS3, it will decode whatever codecs it can and send it as PCM to your receiver. Right now, the PS3 can decode Dolby Digital(-EX) and DTS(-ES), as well as Dolby Digital Plus and Dolby TrueHD. If you've got a receiver capable of handling multichannel PCM through HDMI (and it sounds like you do), then you want to set the PS3 to PCM. This ensures that you're not only getting the older codecs (DD and DTS), but the newer codecs (DD+. TrueHD, and hopefully in the future DTS-HD:Master) and uncompressed 5.1/7.1 PCM tracks as well. Despite the hype, you don't really need a HDMI 1.3 receiver if your player can decode the signal internally.

    08. What should I use for Audio on my PS3 if I can only use Optical?
    If you're using optical, then setting the PS3 to Bitstream is your best option. Unfortunately, either copy protection or bandwidth limits means that optical will only carry DD or DTS, not the newer codecs or uncompressed PCM. That being said, if you have a receiver that can handle PCM over HDMI, use it.

    09. I've heard that even if im not using HDMI and that im using Optical, if I select TrueHD or Uncompressed PCM off of Blu-ray, HD DVD or PS3 games I Will get a better sound than regular surround sound?
    This is somewhat true yes. You will get a higher quality sound, but it will still be greatly degraded from the actual PCM or TrueHD track, so its better than what your probably used to but its certainly not how it should be. Sometimes its hard to tell a difference unless your using a proper HDMI receiver that can handle that stuff to begin with.

    10. How do I properly set up a 7.1 system?
    There is only 1 true formula to use:



    01. You want the 2 front (Left and Right) speakers to be about ear level, the Center speaker should be within a few feet (height wise) from the other too, too far above or below the TV or display and it can ruin the effect. The other speakers are typically thought to be best when put between 2 and 3 ft higher than your ear position when sitting how you normally do. This helps the sound field have more of an effect, and gets rid of nasty localization (an effect that basically makes it easy to tell where the sound is coming from) this way the sound field is all around you instead of sounding like coming from a few speakers.

    02. Your going to want to put the two side positions either directly beside your seating position like they show here in the picture, if you put them too far a head of you or behind you then the effect doesn't work.

    03. The most important part, and the one that people screw up the most is the 2 back surround speakers in the 7.1 set up. Here is an easy formula to make sure you get it right every time. This comes from all the high-end theater builders and enthusiasts like my self. It is a tried and tested format that gets perfect results. Measure the distance from your seating position to the back wall or to where you want the speakers behind you (if the back wall is really far away) - your going to want at least a few short feet from your seating position to your back speakers. Measure that distance, multiply that distance by 1.2 and you have the distance that the 2 back speakers should be from each other on the wall. Get it? Its really simple.

    So lets say that you want your 2 back speakers to be 4ft behind you from the couch - you would then put the 2 speakers 4.8ft away from EACH OTHER on the back wall, the distance between the two is important to create a balanced sound field.

    As you can probably tell, there will be a certain point in that formula where you do not want to have the speakers to far behind you.... this is a good thing because at a certain point you wouldn't want the 2 backs so be so far apart that it would seem weird, or youd have to have them on such high volumes it would disturb the order of the field.


    11. Is there an advantage for using 7.1 on 5.1 sources such as most DVDs, Blu-ray or HD DVDs?
    Yes. There is, the set up must be done properly but there is a distinct advantage. I would not call it "better" but 7.1 can fill out a room with sound more than 5.1 can, so if you take a 5.1 source and split the back 2 channels into another 2 creating 5.1 into 7.1 you fill the room with more sound, you are not getting more than 5.1 surround sound by doing this, you are basically just splitting the rear channel into another 2. This is not 7.1, it is 5.1 with PLIIx processing (something your receiver will do if it is a 7.1 receiver), PLIIx processing is a technique that receivers use to mix the signal from 5.1 into 7.1 properly. Most people with 7.1 use it - otherwise your 2 back surrounds will not have sound coming out of them, and by nature a 7.1 set up has the 2 surrounds (not back surrounds) beside you, not behind you like in a 5.1 set up. So using PLIIx is the way to go!

    12. What "levels" of receivers are there out there? Obviously not all of them are the same, with similar functions and abilities?
    No, most are quite different and offer subtle features and abilities over each other, often times this isn't really marketed or advertised to doing your homework first and finding out beforehand is important, below is a break down (taken from Lindahl's great topic at AVS)..
    Level 1
    5.1 receivers that provide SPDIF, 5.1 analog input channels and provide all three processing stages on digital sources.

    Examples: Virtually all 5.1 receivers.

    Level 2
    7.1 receivers that provide SPDIF, 5.1 analog inputs, and provide all three processing stages on digital sources.

    Level 3
    7.1 receivers that provide SPDIF, 5.1 analog inputs, and 5.1 HDMI PCM but can't perform surround processing on PCM digital sources.

    Examples: Panasonic XR57 (no processing at all).

    Level 3.5 (added late in the game)
    7.1 receivers that provide SPDIF, 7.1 analog inputs, and 5.1 HDMI PCM but can't perform surround processing on PCM digital sources.

    Examples: Onkyo x04 series.

    Level 4
    7.1 receivers that provide SPDIF, 5.1/7.1 analog inputs, and 7.1 HDMI PCM but can't perform surround processing on PCM digital sources.

    Examples: Panasonic XR700 (no processing at all). Onkyo 605. Sony STR-DG810 and higher.

    Level 5
    7.1 recievers that provide SPDIF, 5.1/7.1 analog inputs, 5.1 HDMI PCM, and allow all three processing types on all digital signals.

    Examples: HK 645 and higher. Marantz SR6001 and higher (only with latest firmware?).

    Level 6
    7.1 receivers that provide SPDIF, 5.1/7.1 analog inputs, 7.1 HDMI PCM, and allow all three processing types on all digital signals.

    Examples: All HDMI Denons. Yamaha RX-V661/HTR-6060 and higher. Pioneer Elite 81TXV and higher. Onkyo 705 and higher. Integra *.8 series.



    ...MORE COMIN' SOON!







    With the recent addition of the Home Theater forum (changed from the Blu-ray section) I decided to move a few things around and change a few things to better suit the changes.

    Over time we will be adding links to high quality speaker manufacturers, subwoofer companies, receivers, information on products and many other things of interest. Feel free to post and discuss anything to do with these products!



    Levels of Receivers explained so you can make a better choice! This list will help you make a better choice, weighing function with ability and price range! You can also ask any of us here for help or advice.



    Level 1

    5.1 receivers that provide SPDIF, 5.1 analog input channels and provide all three processing stages on digital sources.

    Examples: Virtually all 5.1 receivers.

    Level 2
    7.1 receivers that provide SPDIF, 5.1 analog inputs, and provide all three processing stages on digital sources.

    Level 3
    7.1 receivers that provide SPDIF, 5.1 analog inputs, and 5.1 HDMI PCM but can't perform surround processing on PCM digital sources.

    Examples: Panasonic XR57 (no processing at all).

    Level 3.5 (added late in the game)
    7.1 receivers that provide SPDIF, 7.1 analog inputs, and 5.1 HDMI PCM but can't perform surround processing on PCM digital sources.

    Examples: Onkyo x04 series.

    Level 4
    7.1 receivers that provide SPDIF, 5.1/7.1 analog inputs, and 7.1 HDMI PCM but can't perform surround processing on PCM digital sources.

    Examples: Panasonic XR700 (no processing at all). Onkyo 605. Sony STR-DG810 and higher.

    Level 5
    7.1 recievers that provide SPDIF, 5.1/7.1 analog inputs, 5.1 HDMI PCM, and allow all three processing types on all digital signals.

    Examples: HK 645 and higher. Marantz SR6001 and higher (only with latest firmware?).

    Level 6
    7.1 receivers that provide SPDIF, 5.1/7.1 analog inputs, 7.1 HDMI PCM, and allow all three processing types on all digital signals.

    Examples: All HDMI Denons. Yamaha RX-V661/HTR-6060 and higher. Pioneer Elite 81TXV and higher. Onkyo 705 and higher. Integra *.8 series.
    Receivers:
    Denon
    http://usa.denon.com/
    (Excellent quality units. Some seriously nice stuff here. From affordable to High End. High performance, quality and functions. One of my personal favorites, one of the best! Models 2308 and up are worth taking a look for some SERIOUS performance and quality, I myself own the Denon 430


    Onkyo
    http://www.us.onkyo.com/
    (Definitely another great company, models 605 and up are worth a look for something affordable to go well with your PS3 or Blu-ray player!)


    Yamaha
    http://www.yamaha.com/yec/avreceiver...l?CTID=5000300
    (Yet again a great company known for good units. Check out the 1800 and above for great function and quality/ability)
    Marantz
    http://us.marantz.com/default.asp
    (A really great company. Lesser known to a lot of consumers, but very well known to Home Theater enthusiasts)


    NAD
    http://nadelectronics.com/products/av-receivers
    (NAD is a great company and definitely well known to enthusiasts and Home Theater people, great products!)









    Speaker and/or Subwoofer Companies worth taking a look at:

    AscendAcoustics
    http://www.ascendacoustics.com/
    (They make incredibly high quality speakers, hand made in the USA, non-mass produced units, affordable and something for everyone, whether its big rooms or big budget... or small! There are a few of us here in the PS3Forums who own some of these AscendAcoustics Speakers!)


    HSU Research
    http://www.hsuresearch.com/
    (This company specializes in Subwoofers. True Subwoofers. A lot of subwoofers out there in big box stores and HTIB set ups are woofers yes, but are not SUBwoofers. Until you hear the difference you will never know what you were missing, HSU is one of the many great companies out there who make very high quality units, tight, accurate, defined and full)


    Elemental Designs

    http://www.edesignaudio.com/index.php?cPath=2_42
    (Good quality doesn't always mean expensive)


    Cambridge SoundWorks
    http://www.cambridgesoundworks.com/s...egory=speakers
    (High Quality and well established)


    Epik Subwoofers
    http://www.epiksubwoofers.com
    (High end subwoofers comprised of 15" and up woofers. They offer both sealed and ported designs. All their products are made here in USA (aside from the BASH amps, which are made in Canada.) In fact, they make all their own enclosures in house! Their subwoofers are meant to be very affordable and provide consumers excellent sound quality with lots of power.)




    Home Theater and Audio Cables:
    MonoPrice
    http://www.monoprice.com
    (Monoprice offers cables and pretty much every accessory for your home theater at rock bottom unbeatable prices. Great quality cables, wires, adapters, parts, etc)


    Bluejeanscables
    http://www.bluejeanscable.com/
    (High quality Home Theater and Audio cables, for all budgets and qualities desired. Top of the line stuff here)
















    Speaker Wire Information:
    The best place to get speaker wire is at your local Hardware store! You can go get 12guage, lower... or higher for extremely cheap and great quality. Easily beating out the big box stores or many online retailers.

    There is also another hidden truth about speaker wire.

    Please check this VERY informative website for clear, simple and easy to understand TRUTHS about Speaker cable! What you have at home might not be giving you what you want or need! Certain gauges (thickness) and distances will offer different results, if you plan on running some cables for speakers in your home please check this website below to get an idea of what gauge you truly need.

    http://www.roger-russell.com/wire/wire.htm





    Accessories:
    One of my favorite things to accompany a subwoofer is one of these:
    http://www99.shopping.com/xPC-Aurale...solation_Riser
    (it won't let me link directly to their site. Try searching for "Sweet Water + Gramma" and it will come up right away for you. The GRAMMA is one of the larger units, there are smaller ones too)

    Tame Your Environment!
    The GRAMMA is used to float an amp or loudspeaker and yields nearly total acoustic isolation, resulting in a purity of tone that has to be heard to be believed!
    Basically they were intended for band equipment like loud speakers and stacks. But they are easily implemented into a Home Entertainment Set up or Home Theater. Place on under your Subwoofer and you will get some better tones and clarity.

    The major bonus is this can eliminate a lot of nasty vibrations around the area that the Subwoofer is in. Excellent product!!
    Last edited by Ixion; 01-19-2011 at 02:28.

  2. #2
    Dedicated Member
    QuickSilverD's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Age
    25
    Posts
    1,163
    Rep Power
    61
    Points
    125 (0 Banked)
    What are the codecs using in BD and HD-DVD, I heard that the ones used in HD-DVD were better
    Funny Anime Video

    [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]
    I'm saving my points to buy the "Change user title" option, if you wish to help me with that, a donation would be appreciated

  3. #3
    Master Poster
    Ubersnuber's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Age
    32
    Posts
    3,499
    Rep Power
    71
    Points
    12 (0 Banked)
    Glad to see this problem getting solved so quickly!

    I'll link to this thread if I see any "spammers" in the PS3 Discussion area.
    <a href="#" onclick="hoffify_add();return false;"><img src="http://hoffify.co.uk/images/hoffify.png" alt="Hoffify"></a>
    <script type="text/javascript" src="http://hoffify.co.uk/hoff_data.json"></script>
    <script type="text/javascript" src="http://hoffify.co.uk/hoffify.js"></script>

  4. #4
    Apoc
    Guest
    I've got a question relating to HDTV and TV broadcasting.

    I live in Europe and own a normal CRT Sony TV (32"). I plan on getting a HD TV (40") next year but there something bugging me. If I get a HDTV, how will normal tv broadcasting look on it? Will it look ugly compared to a CRT, as I could imagine the image being stretched to fit on a screen with more pixels? Or would the quality be the same as on the CRT? Could someone give me an answer on this as I'm clueless.

    Also, I've heard that the EU wants to have HD broadcasting as a standard in most EU countries in the coming years. Can someone inform me a bit more on this subject?

    I haven't searched, so apologies if this has been asked before

  5. #5
    Forum Elder
    nekon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Age
    29
    Posts
    2,738
    Rep Power
    63
    Points
    0 (0 Banked)
    Quote Originally Posted by QuickSilverD View Post
    What are the codecs using in BD and HD-DVD, I heard that the ones used in HD-DVD were better
    Video: both use MPEG-2, MPEG-4/H.264/AVC, and VC1

    Audio (HD-DVD): Lossy: Dolby Digital Plus/DTS/Dolby Digital/MPEG Audio
    Audio (HD-DVD): Lossless: DTS HD
    Audio (Blu-ray): Lossy: Dolby Digital AC-3, DTS, Plus, and linear PCM (up to 7.1 channels)
    Audio (Blu-ray): Lossless: Dolby TrueHD/DTS HD

    the difference in the media comes down to storage capacity (blu-ray holds more), the lossless audio standard, and the java menus found on Blu-ray discs.


    Samsung HL-S5087W 50" DLP Display
    Yamaha RX-V2700 AV Receiver
    Microsoft Xbox 360 Premium
    Sony Playstation 3 @ 1080p


  6. #6
    Superior Member
    Danny Dan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Age
    27
    Posts
    697
    Rep Power
    58
    Points
    253 (0 Banked)
    I just recently bought my KDS-R60XBR2 and a Pioneer audio receiver which can be found here:

    http://www.bestbuy.com/site/olspage....=1138083770528

    Right now, I have 5.1 DVD player w/ surround sound and I wanted everything from movies to games come in surround sound. The pioneer is a 7.1 receiver.

    Would I be able to buy 2 additional speakers to add for a total of 7 speakers (plus the sub) to make 7.1 using the receiver??

    And if so, are there any specific speakers I would have to buy to have them as my 'rear' speakers?

    I hope my questions make sense, 'cause i have no idea what i just finished typing; and good idea with this thread!

  7. #7
    Newbie

    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Age
    27
    Posts
    37
    Rep Power
    0
    Points
    253 (0 Banked)
    ive got a lcd ( not hd ) Will this still be good to use with the ps3?

  8. #8
    Superior Member
    Danny Dan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Age
    27
    Posts
    697
    Rep Power
    58
    Points
    253 (0 Banked)
    Quote Originally Posted by richas04 View Post
    ive got a lcd ( not hd ) Will this still be good to use with the ps3?
    What kind of LCD? If you can post a link to your TV's specs we can tell you a little better.

    Overall, LCD TVs are good quality, but just post a link to your TV or at least the model number.

  9. #9
    Newbie

    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Age
    27
    Posts
    37
    Rep Power
    0
    Points
    253 (0 Banked)

  10. #10
    Member
    DarkManX's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Age
    30
    Posts
    108
    Rep Power
    0
    Points
    0 (0 Banked)
    The quality of standard broadcast depends largely on a couple factors. First the type of TV: DLP, LCD, Plasma, CRT. In a nutshell it goes like this CRT>Plasma>LCD>DLP. Plasma is the best type since its more closely related to CRT's. Of course, if you stretch the image to fill the widescreen, it will look bad on certain channels, but you can keep the aspect ratio the same to help minimize quality loss. And finally, it really depends on TV and brand, so you can't really generalize all of them. Just have to shop around.

    When HD content becomes standard, as long as you have an TV with a built in tuner, then you should receive any HD channels through either the cable company and antenna.


    Quote Originally Posted by Apoc View Post
    I've got a question relating to HDTV and TV broadcasting.

    I live in Europe and own a normal CRT Sony TV (32"). I plan on getting a HD TV (40") next year but there something bugging me. If I get a HDTV, how will normal tv broadcasting look on it? Will it look ugly compared to a CRT, as I could imagine the image being stretched to fit on a screen with more pixels? Or would the quality be the same as on the CRT? Could someone give me an answer on this as I'm clueless.

    Also, I've heard that the EU wants to have HD broadcasting as a standard in most EU countries in the coming years. Can someone inform me a bit more on this subject?

    I haven't searched, so apologies if this has been asked before

  11. #11
    Newbie

    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Age
    27
    Posts
    37
    Rep Power
    0
    Points
    253 (0 Banked)
    Quote Originally Posted by richas04 View Post
    ive got a lcd ( not hd ) Will this still be good to use with the ps3?
    Can anyone anwser this? (i hate 25 rule)

  12. #12
    Forum Sage

    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Posts
    7,759
    Rep Power
    79
    Points
    99 (0 Banked)
    Quote Originally Posted by richas04 View Post
    Can anyone anwser this? (i hate 25 rule)
    Yup, it's better than a normal non LCD tv I guess.But it depends what are the specs? 1024 by 764 or something like that?

  13. #13
    Newbie

    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Age
    27
    Posts
    37
    Rep Power
    0
    Points
    253 (0 Banked)
    Yes its 1024 by 768
    how many hertz should it be?

  14. #14
    REFLEX
    Guest
    Wow.... ok. I Knew this would happen, I wake up and there are 13 replies! Hehe... alright I Have a busy day a head of me, then I gotta come home and Ill start organizing and gathering information for this FAQ!!! Awesome - keep it up! The more people answer the more I can fact check and add things. I got some more ideas too for later.

  15. #15
    Newbie

    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Age
    27
    Posts
    37
    Rep Power
    0
    Points
    253 (0 Banked)
    Quote Originally Posted by richas04 View Post
    Yes its 1024 by 768
    how many hertz should it be?
    Can anyone answer this plz?

  16. #16
    REFLEX
    Guest
    Quote Originally Posted by Danny Dan View Post
    I just recently bought my KDS-R60XBR2 and a Pioneer audio receiver which can be found here:

    http://www.bestbuy.com/site/olspage....=1138083770528

    Right now, I have 5.1 DVD player w/ surround sound and I wanted everything from movies to games come in surround sound. The pioneer is a 7.1 receiver.

    Would I be able to buy 2 additional speakers to add for a total of 7 speakers (plus the sub) to make 7.1 using the receiver??

    And if so, are there any specific speakers I would have to buy to have them as my 'rear' speakers?

    I hope my questions make sense, 'cause i have no idea what i just finished typing; and good idea with this thread!
    If your getting a reciever now (ESPECIALLY IF ITS 7.1) Make SURE to get a HDMI reciever! This way you can take advantage of the higher quality sound codecs like TrueHD and Uncompressed PCM!! Its great stuff and youll love it. Having said that, if your reciever doesnt have HDMI your fine too as the newer gen discs have great sound for non HDMI users as well.


    You could technically use any speakers you want, ideally you want them to be all the same. Or atleast the same size and same power..... this way you create a much more unified sound field.

    Let me show you what 7.1 should roughly look like!




    VITAL to any surround sound set up, you must measuer distances to seating position and dial them into the reciever so you create a proper sound field. If you sit WAY too close to the back wall this will not work properly at all. But luckily "too close" is VERY close. The back 2 speakers are almost the most important in this set up because if you position them too far apart then you leave a big hole in the sound field and thus wrecking the whole reason you did this in the first place.

    The equation for this problem is simple, measuer the distance to the wall from where your ears will be (where you sit!) and then multiply that measurement by 1.2 - simple! And there you go.

  17. #17
    Superior Member

    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Age
    27
    Posts
    850
    Rep Power
    62
    Points
    0 (0 Banked)
    Quote Originally Posted by Apoc View Post
    I've got a question relating to HDTV and TV broadcasting.

    I live in Europe and own a normal CRT Sony TV (32"). I plan on getting a HD TV (40") next year but there something bugging me. If I get a HDTV, how will normal tv broadcasting look on it? Will it look ugly compared to a CRT, as I could imagine the image being stretched to fit on a screen with more pixels? Or would the quality be the same as on the CRT? Could someone give me an answer on this as I'm clueless.

    Also, I've heard that the EU wants to have HD broadcasting as a standard in most EU countries in the coming years. Can someone inform me a bit more on this subject?

    I haven't searched, so apologies if this has been asked before

    As a previous poster has mentioned, it will depend on the tech. I don' know about DLP's but in general the guy who replied to you was right - for SD (standard definition ie 'normal' TV broadcasts) the best tech is generally CRT followed by Plasma then LCD. But it also depends on the processing used by the TV - from my visits to the AV forums (the Euro version of AVS), the Sony X-series and the Sharp XD1E series (2 LCD's) are meant to have very good SD processing.

    Yes its 1024 by 768
    how many hertz should it be?
    1024 by 768 does not relate to 'hertz' but it relates to the pixel count of the TV (1024 pixels wide by 768 pixels high). The minimum pixel count requires for HD is 1280 by 720 so unfortunately your TV is not 'HD Ready'. But the PS3 will still work - but you won't get the same graphical quality as you would on an HDTV.
    Torn between getting a UK or US PS3 - decisions, decisions....

  18. #18
    Newbie

    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Age
    27
    Posts
    37
    Rep Power
    0
    Points
    253 (0 Banked)
    i was talking about the refresh rate. wots the minimum hertz it should have for smooth play?

  19. #19
    Superior Member
    Danny Dan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Age
    27
    Posts
    697
    Rep Power
    58
    Points
    253 (0 Banked)
    If your getting a reciever now (ESPECIALLY IF ITS 7.1) Make SURE to get a HDMI reciever! This way you can take advantage of the higher quality sound codecs like TrueHD and Uncompressed PCM!! Its great stuff and youll love it. Having said that, if your reciever doesnt have HDMI your fine too as the newer gen discs have great sound for non HDMI users as well.
    Man you had me scared with the first two sentences as I didn't get it with HDMI. Unfortunately that is way too much for my pocket right now at least. Other than that, will an optical cable be ok and still experience the TrueHD? Its not a requirement (only for ultimate results) to have HDMI connectivity to have True HD, the lossless sounds, and such correct?

    I kind of got the 7.1 surround setup pretty much packed. Only thing, cause of my unusual living room setup. Would you recommend placing speakers overhead? Like in the ceiling, prolly 6-8 feet over head (while sitting down)? because that is probably what im going to have to do, and I really don't want to buy stands and place them behind the sitting area.

    Thanks for your help.

  20. #20
    Member
    DarkManX's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Age
    30
    Posts
    108
    Rep Power
    0
    Points
    0 (0 Banked)
    Quote Originally Posted by richas04 View Post
    ive got a lcd ( not hd ) Will this still be good to use with the ps3?
    Does the lcd have component input since I am assuming it doesn't support hdmi? Generally, older lcd screens have poor pixel response times. You need a response time at about 6ms or less. Eitherwise you will have a ghosting effect when playing games with lots of motion. If this lcd was meant to be a computer monitor, then it will not make a good gaming screen. If the lcd doesn't support HD, then you are better off with a non hd crt then a non hd lcd.

  21. #21
    Member
    DarkManX's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Age
    30
    Posts
    108
    Rep Power
    0
    Points
    0 (0 Banked)
    Speaker placement isn't too big of a hassle as long as you have them placed in the arrangement as pictured above. To get accurate positioning you will have to tune the receiver with a sound level meter and adjust the dB to each individual speaker until they are all even.

    Quote Originally Posted by Danny Dan View Post
    Man you had me scared with the first two sentences as I didn't get it with HDMI. Unfortunately that is way too much for my pocket right now at least. Other than that, will an optical cable be ok and still experience the TrueHD? Its not a requirement (only for ultimate results) to have HDMI connectivity to have True HD, the lossless sounds, and such correct?

    I kind of got the 7.1 surround setup pretty much packed. Only thing, cause of my unusual living room setup. Would you recommend placing speakers overhead? Like in the ceiling, prolly 6-8 feet over head (while sitting down)? because that is probably what im going to have to do, and I really don't want to buy stands and place them behind the sitting area.

    Thanks for your help.

  22. #22
    REFLEX
    Guest
    Quote Originally Posted by DarkManX View Post
    Speaker placement isn't too big of a hassle as long as you have them placed in the arrangement as pictured above. To get accurate positioning you will have to tune the receiver with a sound level meter and adjust the dB to each individual speaker until they are all even.
    This is correct. Recievers have a built in test sound pattern, use that to try to level out the db levels. after getting the speakers set in the right place (remember to get measurements twice first! then place) using the equation I gave for back speakers (1.2 times distance to from your head on the couch/chair to where the speakers will be = your distance apart from each other on the wall/ceiling). Then youll have to set the levles and adjust for the position.

    HDMI is needed for TrueHD sound yes..... but I wouldnt worry, youll enjoy a lot of stuff out of the regular sound on these films, it is defenitly higher quality than regular DVD. And regardless, if done properly surround sound sounds great either way. Get the setup done properly and youll create a proper sound field in your viewing area and youll love it.

  23. #23
    Superior Member

    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Age
    27
    Posts
    850
    Rep Power
    62
    Points
    0 (0 Banked)
    Quote Originally Posted by richas04 View Post
    i was talking about the refresh rate. wots the minimum hertz it should have for smooth play?
    Hertz is basically the refresh rate (frames per second) of the screen (can anyone please correct me if I am wrong). Unless your TV is very very old and/or very very cheap, this shouldn't be a problem - most televisions support 60Hz, since that is one of the specs of NTSC. What should be of greater concern is how your TV handles the motion that it has to display. Some old/cheap flat-panel displays suffer from 'ghosting' which is the effect occurring when very fast motion leaves a trail of pixels that are not quick enough to respond. Plasmas are generally better than LCD's at fast motion so you should be OK, although to what extent this effect occurs on your TV is something that only you can judge.
    Torn between getting a UK or US PS3 - decisions, decisions....

  24. #24
    REFLEX
    Guest
    Quote Originally Posted by sonics6 View Post
    Hertz is basically the refresh rate (frames per second) of the screen (can anyone please correct me if I am wrong). Unless your TV is very very old and/or very very cheap, this shouldn't be a problem - most televisions support 60Hz, since that is one of the specs of NTSC. What should be of greater concern is how your TV handles the motion that it has to display. Some old/cheap flat-panel displays suffer from 'ghosting' which is the effect occurring when very fast motion leaves a trail of pixels that are not quick enough to respond. Plasmas are generally better than LCD's at fast motion so you should be OK, although to what extent this effect occurs on your TV is something that only you can judge.
    Yes, "ghosting" is an effect mostly related to LCD screens (although technically it could happen on any HDTV with bad response times) because of their mostly bad response times in the past. A year ago response times for LCD was anywhere between 8ms and 12ms. Now its getting down to 4ms. And thats not the lowest! For other TV technologies resposne times of 2.5ms have been going for a while now, the Sony SXRDs and XBR's have a response time of 2.5ms, NO GHOSTING.

    For the user who asked the question about this and wants to know, there is a detailed explination of ghosting/response time above in the FAQ.

  25. #25
    Superior Member

    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Age
    27
    Posts
    850
    Rep Power
    62
    Points
    0 (0 Banked)
    I read through the first post - good job Reflex! There something you might want to add in the 'contrast' question - many people get confused between 'contrast' and 'dynamic constrast' . For those who don't know, dynamic contrast is a technique manufacturers use to artifically enhance the contrast of the picture via additional processing. Every self-respecting videophile turns this feature off because it does more harm than good. The figures people buying TV's should be looking at are actual contrast rather than dynamic. Hope this helps!
    Torn between getting a UK or US PS3 - decisions, decisions....

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Similar Threads

  1. PSP Network question
    By Munky in forum PlayStation Legacy
    Replies: 17
    Last Post: 09-22-2008, 00:13
  2. First Game Ever for the PS3 to be Launched In Japan!!!
    By XforEVER in forum PlayStation 3
    Replies: 44
    Last Post: 08-06-2008, 16:09
  3. Why so short?
    By DeanoIV in forum PlayStation 3 Games
    Replies: 88
    Last Post: 09-01-2007, 08:57
  4. Replies: 16
    Last Post: 04-24-2007, 04:52

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts

PSU

Playstation Universe

Reproduction in whole or in part in any form or medium without express written permission of Abstract Holdings International Ltd. prohibited.
Use of this site is governed by our Terms of Use and Privacy Policy.

vBCredits II Deluxe v2.1.0 (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2010-2014 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.