Are motion-sensitive controllers the wave of the future?

Redrider

Forum Guru
May 14, 2006
3,798
1
0
#1
I saw this article this morning and it gives some good insight on the history of motion sensing controllers and should dismiss the rumor that Sony copied Netindo. If you go to the link below this article has some good pictures of the wiimote, however the pictures of the PS3 controller may not be accurate.



http://ps3.ign.com/articles/712/712731p1.html
 
May 25, 2005
2,860
0
0
#2
Personally, I hope not. I prefer the traditional controller, letting the buttons determine the action of your character, or what's going on around you (in the game).

*edit*

Who wants to bet that Microsoft uses motion sensor technology in their x720 controller? After all this talking trash, that would be funny to see.

/saves all these quotes from Bill Gates and Mr. Moore regarding motion sensoring
 

Naboomagnoli

Master Poster
Dec 17, 2005
3,100
0
36
#3
I absolutely hope motion sensitivity will become the way of the future. If it becomes standard, that means it caught on well and was an improvement - and who doesn't want progress?

The potential for motion sensitivity is massive, whether it's as integral as the Wii's control design, or more of an addition a la PS3. People with imaginations are coming up with all sorts of exciting and original possibilities as well as more obvious adaptations of the controls, and as well as re-invigorating existing genres we will see a lot of new types of game emerge from motion sensitivity over the next 5 years.
 
May 25, 2005
2,860
0
0
#5
That's the thing. I prefer it as an additional feature. I don't like the idea of developers having to rely on it. I don't like the idea of 'having' to move the controller around to control the action on screen.

I agree with you though. There will be a lot of exciting stuff to come from this. I just prefer to have an option.

killzone_71 said:
x720 huh? nice name for an xbox. :lol:
Yup, their next xbox after the x360. :D
 
T

tre

Guest
#6
if nerds wanted to move around they would play sport.

Its a crap feature its going to fail.
 
May 25, 2005
2,860
0
0
#8
Eric2929 said:
sevendesigns said:
killzone_71 said:
x720 huh? nice name for an xbox. :lol:
Yup, their next xbox after the x360. :D
It won't be Xbox720, I can almost guarantee you that. 360 makes sense, 720... not so much.
I sorta relized that a long time ago. But again, 360 really doesn't make much sense either. I only say 'x720' because it shows it's a follow up to the 360.

If it's called "Xbox: We Hope It's Good Enough", I wouldn't mind.
 

Knive

Apprentice
May 6, 2006
476
0
0
#9
I think motion sensing is a fad....the second I heard Nintendo was going that way, I lost intrest in owning a nintendo console..... I would have done the same with PS3, but thankfully they kept the motion inside a conventional controller. So if motion does fail (Like it has in the past), you still have a traditional controller to use.
 

Knive

Apprentice
May 6, 2006
476
0
0
#11
Yeah but thanks to the nunchuku feature, the wii remote, becomes a controller... :p

I think the infra-red eye toy they are working on, would sooner create virtual reality than any motion controller ever could...

But as I've said before....I play games for simulation...if I want the real thing....I'll do the real thing. Nothing can beat the genuine article!
 

GunTeng

Elite Guru
May 1, 2006
5,166
1
0
13
#12
I was just thinking. (yeah, it was a 1st & quite taxing. lol)
MS had a PC gyro-controller & they say it didn't do very well. It was not accepted by gamers.
They say this (IMO) to affect peoples perception on the PS3 controller.

But the point is....PC gamers don't even accept controllers. The majority of PC gamers would crucify you if you suggested they play games using controllers.

For those that are more of a console gamer, you would be more use to controllers & would likely warmly accept the gyro-feature with the PS3 without any problems.

So I think the gyro/motion-sensing conrollers will come into their own now & will be a success for both SONY & Nintendo :)
 

Itaintrite

Super Elite
Jan 2, 2006
2,493
0
0
36
www.mangabrothel.com
#13
Knive said:
Yeah but thanks to the nunchuku feature, the wii remote, becomes a controller... :p

I think the infra-red eye toy they are working on, would sooner create virtual reality than any motion controller ever could...

But as I've said before....I play games for simulation...if I want the real thing....I'll do the real thing. Nothing can beat the genuine article!
Yes yes, nothing beat running over an old lady with a firetruck in real life, or shooting someone in the head with a shotgun and see all the realistic particles flying about eh?
 

Naboomagnoli

Master Poster
Dec 17, 2005
3,100
0
36
#14
Actually now you mention it, it's about time I entered the King of Iron Fist tournament. I think I'll go there by futuristic Spitfire-ish plane that can also hover.
 
Dec 14, 2005
396
0
0
#15
I personally could care less about motion sensing thing. When I play my games it's kick backed in one my lazy boys all chill like. So I hope they never lose traditional style control in favor of this. Just make it an add feature for the ones that think it is cool.
 

Naboomagnoli

Master Poster
Dec 17, 2005
3,100
0
36
#16
So you're not fussed about progress because you might have to move a little bit? Bear in mind of course that the amount of movement you'll actually have to do in these games will be relatively small compared to the exaggerated movements at E3. Considering you can easily play Warhawk one-handed, it's hardly going to be taxing..

Or maybe you DO care, since you said you could care less, not couldn't.


edit:I dunno, it's up to you if you're not that bothered.. it just disappoints me that people can be so apathetic over what is most likely going to be a major advance in gaming, simply because it might involve movement.
 
Mar 21, 2005
13,546
0
0
www.ps3portal.com
#17
I saw this article this morning and it gives some good insight on the history of motion sensing controllers and should dismiss the rumor that Sony copied Netindo
actuelly neither were first it started preaty much with comps. but dont worry guys M$ has a motion senstive one in the works now :lol: without a doubt they will jump inot it, and hopefully everyone gets on them about copying people.
 
Apr 13, 2006
92
0
0
#20
Yes.

Similar in principle to how the analog stick was a blatant improvement over the d-pad for controlling characters in "3D" environments, there are some things that motion sensory will improve. With the market and the developer community embracing such improvement, why would there be a reversion to an old method that is not as efficient, or sufficient at all?

As Nunchaku demonstrates best, motion sensory can be cleverly integrated, while keeping old functionality that remains significant. At that point, motion sensory is only ADDING to the amount of gameplay design opportunities; interactivity opportunities. Why would there be a reversion to an old method that excludes this functionality, thus excluding tons of design opportunities?
 
Jun 15, 2006
100
0
0
#21
sevendesigns said:
That's the thing. I prefer it as an additional feature. I don't like the idea of developers having to rely on it. I don't like the idea of 'having' to move the controller around to control the action on screen.
I agree. I want games that support to the motion sensor feature to have a controller option to turn on or off the motion sensing aspecting.

I can see the Wii be very fun and I'll probably get one (Metroid being one of my all time favorite franchises and the sole reason I own a gamecube) but I can't see being a hardcore Wii fan, that sounded a bit.... odd...
The Wii's motion sensing feature will be great but I can see people getting tired (litterally) after an hour or two of gameplay.

I can sit and play Armored Core with friends for 6+ hours at time. But my tennis matches rarely last over an hour.
 

Naboomagnoli

Master Poster
Dec 17, 2005
3,100
0
36
#22
Again though, the amount of movement you'd need to make is actually pretty minimal. Considering the amount that most of us move our hands and arms every day to do things like write, eat and drink, pick up and put down small items, play musical instruments/move a mouse etc, I really don't think the pretty tiny movements you'd need to play Warhawk etc are really something to worry about - it's not as if you'll break into a sweat. Apparently the tennis game can be played with little movement, and games like Zelda/Red Steel certainly won't be that taxing at all.
 

skarekrow

Master Poster
Jun 13, 2006
3,182
0
0
38
www.3dbuzz.com
#23
Again I say that MS fails to understand anything. The controllers will both be included with the consoles, this gives users the oppertunity to try them without spending any xtra money on something they dont know if they will like. Just like with the HD-DVD add on and eye toy crap. People wont buy them because they dont need them and since the motion sensitivity will come standard with both the Wii and the PS3 it will give users a feel for it. Kind of like the rumble crap on the ps2 and xbox. People werent too sure about it at first ( I know I wasnt at the time) but it grows on you and yes, ms will be releasing something simular after they stop selling xbox 360's because its lack of features (except some fanboys that will be purchasing ten 360's to try and keep ms in the gaming industry). People had to pay extra for it, and that is why MS's Gyro controller failed, in my opinion.
 

loki22

Superior Member
May 4, 2006
610
0
0
#24
Naboomagnoli said:
Again though, the amount of movement you'd need to make is actually pretty minimal. Considering the amount that most of us move our hands and arms every day to do things like write, eat and drink, pick up and put down small items, play musical instruments/move a mouse etc, I really don't think the pretty tiny movements you'd need to play Warhawk etc are really something to worry about - it's not as if you'll break into a sweat. Apparently the tennis game can be played with little movement, and games like Zelda/Red Steel certainly won't be that taxing at all.
It still would be more movement than is commonly associated with controllers. Personally, I think it's gimmicky. It limits the amount of time a person can play a game. In addition, the degree of error would be much greater. You're much more likely to move or tilt the controller in an unintended manner than to push an unintended button or to move an analog stick in an unintended direction. Moreover, you will likely still have to press buttons and/or use the analog sticks with the motion sensistivity (i.e., even more error trying to push buttons and move sticks while movig the controller).

The argument that a lot of people move the controller when playing games, anyway, isn't compelling. There's a difference between the spazzing I've seen some people do, while trying to play a game, and actually controlling the gameplay by moving the controller.

I really hope that the motion sensitivity is optional on games, and that they bring the rumble back later -- in addition to or in place of the motion sensitivity.
 
B

boomheadshot45

Guest
#25
yes it will be the next standard thingy mabobber on most consoles. I think developers won't rely on it, they'll be smart and utilize it in a smart way
 

Naboomagnoli

Master Poster
Dec 17, 2005
3,100
0
36
#26
loki22 said:
It still would be more movement than is commonly associated with controllers. Personally, I think it's gimmicky. It limits the amount of time a person can play a game. In addition, the degree of error would be much greater. You're much more likely to move or tilt the controller in an unintended manner than to push an unintended button or to move an analog stick in an unintended direction. Moreover, you will likely still have to press buttons and/or use the analog sticks with the motion sensistivity (i.e., even more error trying to push buttons and move sticks while movig the controller).
I disagree, the degree of error certainly wouldn't be greater at all(unless you mean, when you increase the sensitivity to play with smaller movements, the error would also be increased). In fact, if the error is in any way increased, then it would only be because the precision of control would be greatly increased. Yes you're more likely to move the pad by accident than you are to flick a stick/press a button inadvertently, that's a given. However, you're far more likely to be able to perfectly guide a vehicle round a corner with an almost perfect racing line, or fly through an aerial assault course etc with motion sensors than with sticks, because the level of precision you can achieve with (say) +/-70 degrees rotation of an object is far greater than you can manage with sticks, as well as far more intuitive for relative novices. It's the application to other genres that so many people seem to doubt, but the scope is there, and its potential is massive.

The argument that a lot of people move the controller when playing games, anyway, isn't compelling. There's a difference between the spazzing I've seen some people do, while trying to play a game, and actually controlling the gameplay by moving the controller.
Is that really true, though?

The image of someone moving their pad to get the in-game character to jump isn't one of someone gracefully lifting and then lowering the pad in an almost balletic manner - it's of someone mashing the controller, pressing (what they hope) is the jump button, and giving the pad a violent shake. If he presses the wrong button and nothing happens while a big boulder travels towards his character, it's then that he starts to mash the same button even harder, while moving the controller up frantically in the midst of all the panic.

As I sit here, my dad is playing BF2 on the PC, flying a helicopter. He flies very well when under little pressure, and can certainly hold his own against most enemy choppers. However, when he eventually loses control of the chopper under missile lock, in the panic he leans all over the place like you wouldn't believe! He's exactly the same on foot. From a distance, he's not bad with assault rifles, and really enjoys using rocket launchers. However, when someone suddenly encroaches on his little bubble of comfort in a 10m radius of him, he's a right mess - he leans, the very table the PC is on shakes with his muscle spasms and frantic mouse shaking, WASD take a real pounding, and his onscreen character does "the Dance of Death".


It's not because he or others like him consciously think that moving about in his seat / moving a gamepad around actually helps; it's because they haven't developed the articulacy that you or I have through years of gaming experience to maintain calm under pressure. People "spaz" their controller about because they get flustered trying to communicate something to the game and because they haven't fully grasped how, they naturally try to do it via a physical movement. Even if your friends seem calm and collected when everything is going to plan, it's when they start to lose their composure that measured thinking goes out of the window and the controller starts flying about the place.

At the same time of course the intuitive nature of the controls is not just a massive benefit to the inexperienced; the improvement in sensitivity for some aspects of gaming will be a massive aid for people of all gaming abilities, and allow for some really ingenious uses in the hands of talented developers - many of us in this very forum came up with some excellent uses that were more than just gimmicks.

If anything, it's the "people's arms will tire" that isn't a compelling argument. It's hardly any movement at all - my arms never tired back when i worked on a till at Tesco Supermarket full-time, and I was doing far more strenuous armwork than any gamer will ever have to! - and I also remember way back when both my thumbs would be close to bleeding and I got hand cramps from playing games for too long. Needless to say that doesn't happen anymore because I got used to it.

There'd be little difference between the hand movements for moving a pad and for moving a mouse - your gamepad arms would be resting on your lap much as your mouse arm rests on the desk.


I really hope that they bring the rumble back later -- (1) in addition to or (2) in place of the motion sensitivity.
(1) Absolutely. (2) Never. I would sooner sell my PS3 than have them take away such a potentially enormous improvement in games.