Building my first PC - enlisting expertise please!

Shockwave

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Nov 11, 2007
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#1
Hey-o, all!

The time has come to build my first ever gaming PC - a concerted effort to offset the depression that'll set in once I return to Ireland from my stint in Canada.

I'm not tech savvy in the slightest; I mean, I can get around a computer pretty seamlessly and can do general day-to-day stuff but I'm not versed in the likes of matching parts up to complement each other, SLI, over-clocking, BIOS stuff, G-Sync, N-Sync (heh) or optimizing all of the components to get the best out of them for gaming. Basically, I don't know much of the nitty gritty but I'm starting to learn.

Either way, if anyone can look at the below build and offer suggestions/answer the following - I'd love to enlist the expertise of any and all of you lovely folk:


http://ca.pcpartpicker.com/list/tpnk9W


- What sort of performance can I expect from the below?


- Is it an overall good build?


- Can you suggest a case that would work/leave room for any upgrades? (Don't wanna go too overboard as the budget will still need to take into account speakers, monitor, keyboard, mouse, etc.


- Would I need a sound card/anything else necessary?


Though the list there is in PC part picker, I'm looking to buy all of it off the Irish version of Newegg as seen in the screen below (the card isn't in stock at the minute but retails at €260.99) as it seems overall cheaper.

https://imgur.com/a/gvDsE

Thanks for reading and I hope you can help!
 
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Fijiandoce

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Oct 8, 2007
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#2
Can't go wrong with that build.

You may want to invest in a slightly higher wattage PSU (~600W) since capacitors degrade slightly over time. Maybe switch to a GTX 1070 also, since any modern CPU will breeze through almost any title, meaning your GPU is going to determine your visual/performance.

While not completely necessary, you may want to look into a small SSD for your boot drive. In most games, HDD's are more than sufficient, but for windows, you will save yourself so much damn time as the computer ages.

The comparison between my home PC's boot time(which has an SSD), and the PC i use at work (HDD) is hilarious. I can make myself a cuppa in the time it takes to log me in. At home, i just go straight through to opening programs immediately.
 

Shockwave

PSU Editor
Nov 11, 2007
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#3
Thanks for the reply!

Right so, I've replaced the PSU with this one. Also, in terms of SSD, (great idea) I was literally looking at this one just before reading your comment and it makes sense to include one. All good?

As for the card, it's around a hundred euro more to go for this, which I could definitely do if it was a significant enough jump. I'm just little bit confused about the whole 1060/70/80 chipset but different ones like GIGABYTE, EVGA, Asus, MSI. They're all slightly different prices and I don't know why, haha!

Also, is optical drive necessary really? Can't imagine I'll be purchasing retail games or popping in CDs really, seems like a waste of money.
 
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Fijiandoce

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#4
Those all look good :icon_thumright:
If all you've used in your life is HDD PC's, the SSD upgrade will come as the single biggest surprise to you. I got used to having to wait to use my PC, so it came as a big surprise when my desktop was ready for use immediately after typing in my log in details.

The 1060/70/80 thing can be interpreted as Nvidia's performance tiers. Each tier up, equates to better performance. the XX70 is typically favoured since it's more than you need right now, but the GPU wont taper off in performance like the XX60 will over time - meaning you can own it for longer before needed another upgrade, as GPU's are typically the item in need of upgrading for the typical gamer.

For example, i own a 970, i downloaded the BF1 Beta merely to test out how my GPU performs. 1080p60, with max settings, and the card was launched at the end of 2014. So it still has legs even after all this time.

As for the different vendors, they manufacture the GPU. Nvidia merely design the chip. Those companies put them onto PCB's and ship them with their own aftermarket coolers. So really, all you want from these guys is the person who either provides the cheaper option, or a particular cooler that strikes your fancy (the after market coolers generally perform within a few degrees of each other).

As for the optical drive... i have one. My thinking was the same as that of a condom. Better to have one and not need it, than need one, and not have it. I forget the name of my case, but it has a door on the front, so when closed (which is all the time) you don't even know it's there.

EDIT:
Had to find the receipt to get my cases name; Fractal Design Define R4.


A really good PC case imho. It's not flashy, and doesn't really stand out (which i quite like). It's also got quite a bit of expandability. If you want a case that just works, i can vouch for this one... I would post a pic of what mine looks like inside, but i put the CPU cooler on upside down, so i ain't gunna open myself up to any potential abuse from anybody :p.
If you want a really nice looking PC, go look at Brandons recent creation - It has the CPU cooler on the right way and everything :snicker
 
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Shockwave

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Nov 11, 2007
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#5
Awesome, thanks for the explanation. I've watched Digital Foundary's video on the 1070, too, and it seems like the way to go. As you say, definitely better spending the extra few quid for future-proofing at least a bit. With that said, I know you mentioned that the CPU is the least of your problems game-wise, but I'm just looking at the Intel Core i7-6700K as opposed to the i5-6600K, it's 10 percent off bringing a difference of €90 between both. Is it worth it for that price? Probably not but I thought I'd ask.

Lastly, for the case, I'm trying to figure out fittings - I'm seeing ATX on some of the components and this case is a mid-tier ATX - good enough?

Yeah, I was eyeing up Brandan's - looks stunning!
 

Fijiandoce

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#6
If money can be stretched to facilitate an i7, than an i7 would be preferable (since more threads is always going to be welcomed). However, that isn't a non-recommendation of the i5.

I think this is one of those decisions that you'd have to make for yourself since it's akin to biting the bullet ;)

They are essentially the same chip, one merely has better multithreading capabilities. Games get more multithreaded every day, the only real question is at what point will the cut off come whereby 4 cores is no longer viable? I would guess a while. But AMD seem intent on ruffling up that notion (they reportedly want to release an 8 core consumer chip - Not the 8 integer cores from the FX lines, 8 cores in a similar fashion to the intel i5 cores).

However, if you think you may do some light video editing now and then, the i7 is definitely the preferred choice for the shortened render times. But otherwise, you can't go wrong with an i5. The i5 2500k is still doing really well in modern titles, and it is ~4 years old now.

As for the case, imho it's merely a matter of aesthetics, aside from the compatibility. Motherboards come in various form factors, in your case; ATX. You just need a case that supports ATX form factor motherboards (which yours does), To reference Brandons PC again, he was after a small form factor case, which means it only supported m[icro]ATX motherboards. So your's being a full ATX board, would have been too big.
 

K2D

Forum Guru
Oct 19, 2006
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#7
A new pc usually means 3 or 4 months of research in my case. Congrats on your (future) new rig!
 
Apr 1, 2006
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#8
Is this mainly for gaming? what resolution and framerates do you want to hit

Budget the best gpu you can into the build and save on other parts
-I would recommend (970/1060 for 60 fps 1080 | 1070 for some future proofing at 1080 or downsampling higher resolutions)

500 watt PSU will be more than ok

Any Mid Tower should be ok - If your budgeting save here

You don't really need a big cpu cooler even with modest overclocking

System memory isn't super important speed/size almost mean nothing for your frame rates
-It's cheap right now and would recommend 16GB but 8 is perfectly ok for almost every situation

You don't need to go for a super expensive motherboard, just make sure it has the features your looking for

I would recommend an SSD for your boot drive and then you can add whatever slower bigger drives for general media
-Possibly a somewhat large SSD for gaming also

-don't need a sound card

-almost any i5 will work for you, get a K version so you can overclock if you want to push performance later on down the road, an i7 though nice is usually to much for a gaming rig

-as for gaming performance



you have a build on that link for a little over $1000 if you price shopped a bit you could get that down to around $800, if you readjusted some parts you could get the same overall performance or better for around $550
 
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Shockwave

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Nov 11, 2007
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#9
[QUOTE="maltrophstitan, post: 6519996]Is this mainly for gaming? what resolution and framerates do you want to hit

Budget the best gpu you can into the build and save on other parts
-I would recommend (970/1060 for 60 fps 1080 | 1070 for some future proofing at 1080 or downsampling higher resolutions)

500 watt PSU will be more than ok

Any Mid Tower should be ok - If your budgeting save here

You don't really need a big cpu cooler even with modest overclocking

System memory isn't super important speed/size almost mean nothing for your frame rates
-It's cheap right now and would recommend 16GB but 8 is perfectly ok for almost every situation

You don't need to go for a super expensive motherboard, just make sure it has the features your looking for

I would recommend an SSD for your boot drive and then you can add whatever slower bigger drives for general media
-Possibly a somewhat large SSD for gaming also

-don't need a sound card

-almost any i5 will work for you, get a K version so you can overclock if you want to push performance later on down the road, an i7 though nice is usually to much for a gaming rig

-as for gaming performance



you have a build on that link for a little over $1000 if you price shopped a bit you could get that down to around $800, if you readjusted some parts you could get the same overall performance or better for around $550[/QUOTE]

Wow, thanks for the write-up. I was looking around GAF and the likes and revised the build to include the i7 since the price difference wasn't a stretch and I wouldn't mind trying my hand a video editing, too. Additionally, I changed up the RAM to a slightly better one, according to a guy anyway. Here's the full build, minus a case which I'll take longer to shop around for - http://imgur.com/xqJy4pi

I'm hoping for a relatively staple 60fps at 1440p for the latest games, say DOOM and Deus Ex as examples. Is that achievable? Seems so from a quick glance at that chart.

My thinking with the i7 and the RAM is just more future-proofing, really. Spend biggish at the start so I won't have to stump up the cash at a later date. Minus shipping, the above is costing €1130.
 
Apr 1, 2006
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#11
[QUOTE="Shockwave, post: 6520069]Wow, thanks for the write-up. I was looking around GAF and the likes and revised the build to include the i7 since the price difference wasn't a stretch and I wouldn't mind trying my hand a video editing, too. Additionally, I changed up the RAM to a slightly better one, according to a guy anyway. Here's the full build, minus a case which I'll take longer to shop around for - http://imgur.com/xqJy4pi

I'm hoping for a relatively staple 60fps at 1440p for the latest games, say DOOM and Deus Ex as examples. Is that achievable? Seems so from a quick glance at that chart.

My thinking with the i7 and the RAM is just more future-proofing, really. Spend biggish at the start so I won't have to stump up the cash at a later date. Minus shipping, the above is costing €1130.[/QUOTE]

like I said RAM speeds make almost no difference and are not worth paying a premium for, and to some extent size as well.
the cheapest 8GB or 16GB will give you the same performance as 32GB at the fastest DDR4 speeds
if your browsing and gaming on it an i7 is also more than you need and i'd advice putting ANY extra money from the savings on RAM and CPU towards the GPU.

if your at 1440 or higher the less you need in terms of raw CPU power and the more you'll need VRAM and GPU muscle.

You made some good adjustments I'd still get rid of that cpu cooler it's not really going to do much for you over a stock cooler.
700w is overkill but that's not a bad price, Corsair and EVGA are pretty decent PSU brands and anything 500w and up are going to work fine for your build.
you could save on the SSD by dropping it to a 120GB because your just going to have windows and some essential programs on there.
and i'd double check seagates hdd reliability these past few years, im not sure where they sit now but WD and hitachi used to be the best

just did a quick search for you



looks like seagate got their act together recently so look for the manufacture date on your drive.
 

Shockwave

PSU Editor
Nov 11, 2007
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#12
The price difference in the RAM was about €10 but I'll look into getting a cheaper set.

Yeah, the Seagate's date is from this year, thankfully. I've replaced the SSD with half the space, saving around 40 quid. So, a 1070 with 8GB VRAM could feasibly do it? I watched a couple of Digital Foundary videos on the subject, and while I didn't know the ins and outs completely, it seemed as though it performed admirably.

Also, thanks for the link, Ovech-King!
 
Apr 1, 2006
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#13
Yeah 1070 will be great for what your looking at.

With the RAM you have people that will tell you to get 32GB with the fastest you can find or they get 16GB and want 16GB later, just to have with no real performance gains. Same with liquid cooling or getting the fastest CPU you can find, most of these people see a bigger number and think its better for them when its not always the case. Or it is really better but in actuality your not going leverage that extra performance because thats not what you personally use your pc for.
 

Shockwave

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Nov 11, 2007
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#14
Yeah, I see that a lot scouring the forums people tend to latch onto the bigger number, etc. I mean, with this build I like to have the option in the future for whatever reason to add stuff but I don't intend to do so anytime soon, that's for sure. Likewise with the liquid cooling and all. I don't foresee doing the whole overclocking thing until it's worth it/I'm competent enough to do it.

As it stands, the performance I'll get from those parts alone will be more than enough.

Now - the last point of contention. :) A monitor! How's this one look? Main wish is for a 1440p but I'd hope to secure a deal and not break the bank even more. €222.99 seems a great price but the reviews do mention some issues. Might be a bit on the big side, too?
 
Apr 1, 2006
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#15
I'm in the hunt for another monitor so i'll keep you updated as I come across them.

27" I feel is around the perfect size especially for 1440p and higher

G-sync is an expensive option but worth considering if your going to stick with a monitor for a long while
another route is a high refresh 144hz monitor which help give you smooth tracking and responsive control feedback

but i'll keep an eye out as I look at some tomorrow
 
Apr 1, 2006
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#17
This is the best monitor I could find for around $450


LG 27UD68-W 4K UHD IPS

Supports freesync if you want to go that route, no g-sync model sadly
1440p looks really nice on a 4k monitor and often times I don't mind dropping to 1440p to gain some extra frames


This is not THE BEST gaming monitor on the market or anything but it's hard to beat at this price range
It's cheap enough to replace in a year or so when oled drops price or full HDR support comes to monitors.

And a 4K panel i'm probably going to get for a PS4pro with the HDMI 2.0 / IPS 10 bit wider color gamut support

If you don't plan on upgrading in a year or so I might consider a monitor that supports g-sync, I can always tell if it not active on my monitor but im a little sensitive to screen tearing, micro stutter, and input lag

It's actually pretty exhausting looking over all these monitors and double checking specs and reviews from multiple sites.
I might do a mega monitor round-up thread here soon that goes over some of the better ones i've come across

Samsung has some really high end monitors coming out later this year
The CF791 a 21:9 ultrawide | 1440p | 100Hz | "Quantum dots can produce more accurate colors than traditional display technology, and are supposed to come close to OLED display quality."
with G-sync and 4K models coming out next year... something to keep an eye on
 
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Shockwave

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Nov 11, 2007
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#18
Appreciate it all the help, man. Yeah, I'm settled on everything and got things rolling by purchasing the CPU.

The monitor is a real toughie - I was looking at AOC since they seemed the best value but I'm stumped between 1440p/144HZ or 4K and 60HZ. It's hard.

I also go in and out about how much I'm going to spend on the monitor - the Acer Predator looks good. And that CF791 looks absolutely divine!
 

PBM

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Nov 8, 2004
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#19
I second the Fractal Design R4 (or anything from fractal, really) ... I may switch to that case later on. My current one is kind of heavy.

As for liquid cooling, I would do it simply for lower temps and generally quieter performance. It's not just for overclocking. I hate the sound of fans ramping up when I'm doing something intensive like a high end game or video encoding. I have liquid cooling on my CPU and GPU and it rarely goes above 50 C degrees and I never hear the radiator fans speed up. You don't need to go liquid cooling on your GPU though. That drives the price up quite a bit.

As for a monitor, spend more on the gaming monitor. The monitor is very important and you're going to be pissed off if you're having screen tearing and fps lag because you wanted to save a few bucks. If you can afford it I'd definitely go for what your heart is set on. The monitor is just too important to skimp on.

The Acer Predator is ridiculous ... about as ridiculous as the price. It is very sweet though.

If you're going to go with a 4K monitor, you might have some issues with the 1070 ... but as long as you adjust settings it should be okay. It's about on par with the 980 Ti.

Also if you are going with NVIDIA, I'd recommend a G-Sync monitor. FreeSync is generally for AMD cards, although it SHOULD work for both, the types of monitors are optimized for those cards. It's a giant pain in the ass, but that's how it is. Or you could get a monitor with neither, but if you do that I would stick with 144 Hz.
 

MacP

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Jun 27, 2008
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#20
TBH the most expensive hardware when it comes to buying PC components is the CPU and GPU. In all honesty you do not need to spend loads on a motherboard most mid-range motherboards can do what you need.
 

PBM

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#21
[QUOTE="MacP, post: 6521127]TBH the most expensive hardware when it comes to buying PC components is the CPU and GPU. In all honesty you do not need to spend loads on a motherboard most mid-range motherboards can do what you need.[/QUOTE]
Yeah you don't need to go crazy on the motherboard unless a) you need the features and b) you are overclocking. You most definitely don't want to cheap out on the motherboard either. Mid-range is the absolute minimum.
 

Shockwave

PSU Editor
Nov 11, 2007
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#22
[QUOTE="Brandon, post: 6521123]I second the Fractal Design R4 (or anything from fractal, really) ... I may switch to that case later on. My current one is kind of heavy.

As for liquid cooling, I would do it simply for lower temps and generally quieter performance. It's not just for overclocking. I hate the sound of fans ramping up when I'm doing something intensive like a high end game or video encoding. I have liquid cooling on my CPU and GPU and it rarely goes above 50 C degrees and I never hear the radiator fans speed up. You don't need to go liquid cooling on your GPU though. That drives the price up quite a bit.

As for a monitor, spend more on the gaming monitor. The monitor is very important and you're going to be pissed off if you're having screen tearing and fps lag because you wanted to save a few bucks. If you can afford it I'd definitely go for what your heart is set on. The monitor is just too important to skimp on.

The Acer Predator is ridiculous ... about as ridiculous as the price. It is very sweet though.

If you're going to go with a 4K monitor, you might have some issues with the 1070 ... but as long as you adjust settings it should be okay. It's about on par with the 980 Ti.

Also if you are going with NVIDIA, I'd recommend a G-Sync monitor. FreeSync is generally for AMD cards, although it SHOULD work for both, the types of monitors are optimized for those cards. It's a giant pain in the ass, but that's how it is. Or you could get a monitor with neither, but if you do that I would stick with 144 Hz.[/QUOTE]

Yeah, I mean, if the monitor's not up to snuff the whole process of part-picking is sort of useless, haha! You can have a 1080 but if the monitor's muck it ain't gonna be much use. I'd love a 4K -144HZ one, (though I wouldn't expect any real high-end 4K gaming with it) and it seems like we're on the cusp of that with some monitor releases in the near future, but it's anyone's guess what it'd actually cost. I won't be picking one up till near Christmas so I'll keep an eye on anything releasing, plus Amazon Warehouse - get some good deals there.

The MOBO I picked seems pretty good from the research I did. That one, or a ROG.
 
Apr 1, 2006
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[QUOTE="Brandon, post: 6521136]Yeah you don't need to go crazy on the motherboard unless a) you need the features and b) you are overclocking. You most definitely don't want to cheap out on the motherboard either. Mid-range is the absolute minimum.[/QUOTE]
You can do basic over clocking on budget boards, I wouldn't say midrange is the minimum more like high end is unnecessary for a majority of users
 

PBM

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#24
[QUOTE="maltrophstitan, post: 6521138]You can do basic over clocking on budget boards, I wouldn't say midrange is the minimum more like high end is unnecessary for a majority of users[/QUOTE]
I will never recommend a budget board to anyone. The motherboard is simply too important to the entire system. I agree that high end boards are just simply overkill for most use cases.
 
Feb 11, 2008
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#25
Budget is mostly ok for normal users. The problem is lower price, lower quality. That's how I read it. I won't skimp out on the motherboard, ever. I pay for quality.
 

PBM

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#26
[QUOTE="F34R, post: 6521145]Budget is mostly ok for normal users. The problem is lower price, lower quality. That's how I read it. I won't skimp out on the motherboard, ever. I pay for quality.[/QUOTE]
Same here. I mean it's the thing all your things connect to. It better be decent.
 
Apr 1, 2006
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#27
I went ahead and got that LG IPS panel, its On Sale at Best Buy for $400 right now

Played around with the settings and downloaded Dell U2715H ICC from TFTCentral and it looks pretty great
I have a Acer XB280HK as my main gaming monitor and at first after I played around with the LG settings the IPS had much better darks, yellows, browns but i adjusted my acer to match gamma and I got to say the TN panel holds up REALLY well against this IPS

The IPS still has a slight advantage in the darker colors but really i cant tell the difference after adjusting both monitors

The reasons I went with the LG though were the HDMI 2.0 so i could hook up a PS4/Xbox one and hopefully get 4k/60, though i'm not 100% if that 2.0b exclusive or not yet. Otherwise almost no IPS glow or dead pixles

Im still looking over the HDR monitors but i got a tad sidetracked with this little project
still looking to find a 3rd party 4k scaler and see how well that works, I also have a darbee running from the PS4 to a tv and the LG in this set up.
 
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keefy

Supreme Veteran
Nov 18, 2007
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#28
I have bought budget boards in the ast whn I was on a budget, but later found that whenupgraded my GPU and needed to add in extra hard drives for storage the SATA ports were .obstructed by the card itself, with no way to plug in more hard drives. So on a 6 SATA port board I could only use 4 ports. So since then I always buy medium to high end board.
 

MacP

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#29
What I am trying to say is you can get well built motherboards for less these day's. My mobo was £80-£90 when I bought it and it has lasted 3 years and I have not needed to upgrade it.
 

Christopher

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#30
i paid less than $100 on a motherboard 2 years ago. good quality. just not expensive. it has been fine. but i'm running a basic build. no SLI or any of that