Chinese workers build 15-story hotel in just six days

Hitman_T92

TWISTED METAL
Sep 1, 2008
3,844
23
0
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Hangar 18
#1
CHANGSHA (Agencies) -- As the United States and China battle over the finer points of currency manipulation at the G-20 summit, American negotiators may want to take note of this startling testimonial to the productivity of Chinese workers: A construction crew in the south-central Chinese city of Changsha has completed a 15-story hotel in just six days. If nothing else, this remarkable achievement will stoke further complaints from American economic pundits that China's economy is far more accomplished than ours in tending to such basics as construction. Meanwhile, it's easy to imagine the disorientation of Changsha residents who'd gone away, or who just hadn't recently ventured into the downtown neighborhood of the new Ark Hotel: ""Honey, I don't remember a hotel there, do you?"" The work crew erected the hotel -- a soundproofed, thermal-insulated structure reportedly built to withstand a magnitude 9 earthquake -- with all prefabricated materials. In other words, a crew of off-site factory workers built the sections, and their on-site counterparts arranged them on the foundation for the Ark project. Despite the frenetic pace of construction, no workers were injured -- and thanks to the prefab nature of the process, the builders wasted very few construction materials.
[video=youtube;E76uJi744Do]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=E76uJi744Do[/video]
:shock:
 

keefy

Supreme Veteran
Nov 18, 2007
19,031
261
83
The Sock Gap
#9
Prefab doesnt take long its like 1 big meccano set I expect the wirign inside was plug and play also, I have seen that type of stuff in a hospital I worked on 2 years ago.
 
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Ezekiel

Forum Sage
Apr 29, 2006
9,409
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#12
The issue with prefab materials is that the bulk of the labor is done off-site, the man hours are concentrated off-site and thus, the majority of everything including costs are hidden away from the public eye. I'm not impressed by how fast the hotel was assembled, I'm impressed that they've seemingly took a different approach to the whole project and thus, made it un-intrusive to the average Chinese citizen living in Changsha. The name of the game in China is ingenuity and the Chinese seem to have this in spades. Truly commendable work. You know, maybe everyone else should take a page from the Chinese playbook. "Work smart, not hard".
 
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Super_Lilith

Elite Member
Nov 9, 2006
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#14
[QUOTE="Morganator, post: 5272885]The issue with prefab materials is that the bulk of the labor is done off-site, the man hours are concentrated off-site and thus, the majority of everything including costs are hidden away from the public eye. I'm not impressed by how fast the hotel was assembled, I'm impressed that they've seemingly took a different approach to the whole project and thus, made it un-intrusive to the average Chinese citizen living in Changsha. The name of the game in China is ingenuity and the Chinese seem to have this in spades. Truly commendable work. You know, maybe everyone else should take a page from the Chinese playbook. "Work smart, not hard".[/QUOTE]

To be honest it seems to me they are working smart and working hard.

Where as in the uk it seems we strike and campaign everyday while going overbudget, behind schedule and scaling back on projects.
 

kuku

Veteran
Oct 19, 2006
4,310
7
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#15
[QUOTE="Super_Lilith, post: 5272998]To be honest it seems to me they are working smart and working hard.

Where as in the uk it seems we strike and campaign everyday while going overbudget, behind schedule and scaling back on projects.[/QUOTE]

Some of it maybe. I don't trust it's big though. Smart is not in the china centric circle, massive labor is. Can you trust the amount of people needed to work at that speed, and working in not so careful hours of the night, managers and engineers getting their voices in, inspections, etc.

Just the shear logistics of it can be pretty daunting. Who did what, who received what materials in what form, etc. Sure a lot of it is red tape, but some of it is otherwise needed red tape. To double check one's work so that mistakes aren't made.

Then there is the thing with culture. Chinese buildings in china have much different building code, or any building code as sometimes can happen. Insulation is still a foreign concept in most buildings, as are other engineering feats. Steel and concrete, steal and concrete, that's all they do. The not so little things that make engineers and architects run around building and managers busy, are usually not present in chinese city buildings.

Other countries are of course bogged down by massive red tape, some of which is un-needed, but some are. Inspections, contracts, zoning, etc, slow a building down a lot. Building codes that have to be following can cause a lot of problems, and money. As with the labor of non-grunts. You can't pour cement without a certain person, you can't get a dozen electricians on your budget, you can't have a bunch of engineers running around looking over your project, etc. Too bad I'm not in the construction field or I would know exactly how a building gets raised.

I won't say I would be scared to stay at a hotel built in 6 days(before reno) but sure as heck wouldn't mind looking elsewhere first.
 

Super_Lilith

Elite Member
Nov 9, 2006
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#16
[QUOTE="kuku, post: 5273052]Some of it maybe. I don't trust it's big though. Smart is not in the china centric circle, massive labor is. Can you trust the amount of people needed to work at that speed, and working in not so careful hours of the night, managers and engineers getting their voices in, inspections, etc.

Just the shear logistics of it can be pretty daunting. Who did what, who received what materials in what form, etc. Sure a lot of it is red tape, but some of it is otherwise needed red tape. To double check one's work so that mistakes aren't made.

Then there is the thing with culture. Chinese buildings in china have much different building code, or any building code as sometimes can happen. Insulation is still a foreign concept in most buildings, as are other engineering feats. Steel and concrete, steal and concrete, that's all they do. The not so little things that make engineers and architects run around building and managers busy, are usually not present in chinese city buildings.

Other countries are of course bogged down by massive red tape, some of which is un-needed, but some are. Inspections, contracts, zoning, etc, slow a building down a lot. Building codes that have to be following can cause a lot of problems, and money. As with the labor of non-grunts. You can't pour cement without a certain person, you can't get a dozen electricians on your budget, you can't have a bunch of engineers running around looking over your project, etc. Too bad I'm not in the construction field or I would know exactly how a building gets raised.

I won't say I would be scared to stay at a hotel built in 6 days(before reno) but sure as heck wouldn't mind looking elsewhere first.[/QUOTE]

my degree is in engineering, and I have had extensive training in civil, including cradle to grave and forensics of structures.
 

higgos22

Master Guru
Feb 8, 2009
6,619
10
0
#17
Haha just imagine that happening somewhere here or in your city "Hey im pretty sure that building wasnt there last weekend?"
 

kuku

Veteran
Oct 19, 2006
4,310
7
0
#18
[QUOTE="Super_Lilith, post: 5273231]my degree is in engineering, and I have had extensive training in civil, including cradle to grave and forensics of structures.[/QUOTE]

Then perhaps you should goto china to see how their buildings are made. It's an eye opener. It's very different from western world building codes and design. It's cheap, it's stark, and it's rather lacking in more modern ideals.

Smart is only an application if you're mean cost effective. The idea of safety codes or energy savings is all but myth.

A last gen building in china city would have 10 flights of neck breaking, narrow steps, and crude designs, that will bake people in the summer and freeze people in (mild) winters, and a death trap if a fire ever broke out.

The more resent buildings I've seen raised in china are more better and I heard codes are more friendly now (No more 10floor elevator-less buildings no more death by fire traps) but still a far cry from say a US building code(which I am more familiar with) that are many many times more stringent. And that's minimum code.

Heck everything from electric to plumbing is vastly more simple in chinese buildings. No heat at all, it's all gas(canister) brought. So all you have is straight public water.

Can't really compare different country building requirements.
 
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Super_Lilith

Elite Member
Nov 9, 2006
1,724
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0
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#21
[QUOTE="kuku, post: 5273417]Then perhaps you should goto china to see how their buildings are made. It's an eye opener. It's very different from western world building codes and design. It's cheap, it's stark, and it's rather lacking in more modern ideals.

Smart is only an application if you're mean cost effective. The idea of safety codes or energy savings is all but myth.

A last gen building in china city would have 10 flights of neck breaking, narrow steps, and crude designs, that will bake people in the summer and freeze people in (mild) winters, and a death trap if a fire ever broke out.

The more resent buildings I've seen raised in china are more better and I heard codes are more friendly now (No more 10floor elevator-less buildings no more death by fire traps) but still a far cry from say a US building code(which I am more familiar with) that are many many times more stringent. And that's minimum code.

Heck everything from electric to plumbing is vastly more simple in chinese buildings. No heat at all, it's all gas(canister) brought. So all you have is straight public water.

Can't really compare different country building requirements.[/QUOTE]

You sound really defensive.