How will you connect your PS4 to the internet ?

chriharr

Apprentice
Jun 9, 2011
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GREAT SOUTHERN LAND
#1
Now this may seem like a pointless thread because a lot of people are going to say "the same internet connection i've always used" whether that be WiFi and/or ethernet, however in my case I recently discovered that I have way too many WiFi devices in my house and that that as of now, I'm starting to see a large drop in WiFi performance and even though I'm using an 802.11n 2.4/5.0 dual band WiFi router that is supposed to be capable of up to 32 devices theoretically, real world performance suffers.. I did a speed test last night with my router, 4 devices were connected and weren't drawing much bandwidth from the router and My ping was 19ms with 48mbps down, 1.24mbps up.

I did the same test again this time with gigabit ethernet directly to my cable modem and I got 5ms ping 122mbps down and 2.84mbps up much much improved, so today I have replaced 3 major WiFi devices with wired connections and a spare wired connection is there ready for PS4.

I didn't ever remember having any real slow downs the past two years at my place with WiFi, there are however 12 visible SSID's that are within range on my street, it could possibly be the Wii U I purchased recently (that thing has the worst WiFi hardware in the world, drop outs all the time (one of the main reasons for going wired) it apparently uses WiFi direct 5.0GHz to connect the gamepad to the system, wireless devices are flying everywhere, my home theatre system has wireless speakers that operate in the 2.4GHz spectrum then there's iPad, 2 iPhone, 2 MBP laptops, PS3, Wii U, 2 wireless printers, TV, blu-ray player in bedroom, Vita and that's all I can think of at the moment.

So anyway long story short has anyone else experienced WiFi performance issues that bad that they've switched back to wired connections?... I think gaming really benefits from a wired connection it seems blazing compared to wireless, it seems wireless even though it's improved greatly over the years just still doesn't cut it especially when there's a trillion radio devices connecting to everything all over the street

MY PS4 IS GOING TO BE WIRED TO THE CLOUD
 

Ariakace

Dedicated Member
Mar 12, 2008
1,173
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New Jersey
#3
the same internet ive always used!!! lol. Wireless for me though... i have my PC hardlined into the router, and i spend much too much time moving my PS3 from my living room to my room so i can play some games on there while i watch netflix on my PS3, wirelessly of course. When i get my PS4, the PS3 will probably be moving to my room permanently. I can pretty much guarentee ill be using it as a netflix box from that point on save for a few PS3 games (Beyond, MGS:GZ, then it will move back to my living room for the time being).

Also the only reason i know what kind of router i have is because i just replaced it like, a month ago lol
 

MjW

Forum Sage
Oct 30, 2006
7,873
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#4
Wireless as this gen. Only iMac is connected with gigabit Ethernet.


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MjW

Forum Sage
Oct 30, 2006
7,873
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#7
[QUOTE="on the rocks, post: 6198175]I see wireless n 5 ghz as an option. That is what I would use but does ps4 even support 5 ghz band?[/QUOTE]

I'd like to believe that it will support 5Ghz. It is 2013 anyway.

On the other hand Sony sold a digital only, portable console with 802.11b.


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TAZ427

Elite Guru
Nov 29, 2007
5,303
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Sugar Land, TX
#11
The WiFi performance should have nothing to do with the number of connections, but the activity that's going on. I personally have 17 devices connected to my wifi at any given time, but not a lot of activity. Performance tests usually have my ping rate < 20ms and DL rates of ~20-25Mbps and ~16mbps UL (which is the top end of the Data Rate performance of the cable modem service I'm paying for - more than sufficient for my needs.) I get maybe a 2-3ms improvement in ping rate by connecting via the 1Gbps Ethernet on my Cable Modem.

I will say that you can start running into DL/UL rate limitations, but there's no way you should see that kind of increase on the ping rate over WiFi unless you don't have things setup correctly. You may want to look into using port forwarding to help this, though 14ms difference isn't really that significant of an increase. I'm sure you'll end up finding that the bottleneck will not be you wifi but somewhere between you and PSN servers for DL games and content on the PS4.

Personally, I'm not pulling wires through my walls up two floors to the attic, across the house, and back down into my Game Room for a direct LAN connection when I know it's not going to buy me anything. I'll be use 802.11n dual band connection.
 

chriharr

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Jun 9, 2011
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GREAT SOUTHERN LAND
#14
[QUOTE="on the rocks, post: 6198175]I see wireless n 5 ghz as an option. That is what I would use but does ps4 even support 5 ghz band?[/QUOTE]

I'm pretty sure Sony will offer dual band 2.4GHz and 5.0GHz 802.11n radios with PS4 they would be crazy not to as Xbox One has it standard in the box
 

jj03

Elite Guru
Apr 7, 2007
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#15
Will be wireless..as always..router has perfect line of sight so...

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Venger

Forum Elder
Jun 16, 2005
2,786
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#16
If I had a choice I'd go Ethernet cable, but I didn't so I'll connect to the 802.11n dual band network I use now. Cable service is on a different floor on the other side of the house. I did however essentially remove any 802.11g devices I had on that network along the way since n networks drop down to g for compatibility, by adding 802.11n wireless Ethernet extenders, and I now run a second separate 802.11g network for legacy devices. I currently see an average test speed of 31.63Mbps down and 7.75Mbps up over wireless, I ping back at 34ms.

I may have to track down an Ethernet cable and try a direct test, be interesting to see if there's any difference and if so by how much. Not that it would be viable as a long term solution in this house, but maybe the next house will be wired properly.
 

MjW

Forum Sage
Oct 30, 2006
7,873
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#18
[QUOTE="TAZ427, post: 6198348]The WiFi performance should have nothing to do with the number of connections, but the activity that's going on. I personally have 17 devices connected to my wifi at any given time, but not a lot of activity. Performance tests usually have my ping rate < 20ms and DL rates of ~20-25Mbps and ~16mbps UL (which is the top end of the Data Rate performance of the cable modem service I'm paying for - more than sufficient for my needs.) I get maybe a 2-3ms improvement in ping rate by connecting via the 1Gbps Ethernet on my Cable Modem.

I will say that you can start running into DL/UL rate limitations, but there's no way you should see that kind of increase on the ping rate over WiFi unless you don't have things setup correctly. You may want to look into using port forwarding to help this, though 14ms difference isn't really that significant of an increase. I'm sure you'll end up finding that the bottleneck will not be you wifi but somewhere between you and PSN servers for DL games and content on the PS4.

Personally, I'm not pulling wires through my walls up two floors to the attic, across the house, and back down into my Game Room for a direct LAN connection when I know it's not going to buy me anything. I'll be use 802.11n dual band connection.[/QUOTE]

Wireless can be setup to perform as good as ethernet in many situations, as long as the home you are living is ideal, placement of the router correct, and you choose the best components.

When I had the PC I was at 2-3 ping with speeds around 90-120Mbit. Ethernet had the same ping but throughput was at 100%, stable 200Mbits, my connection at the time.

It also solved other "wireless problems". For example, when I was wirelessly downloading torrents at ~100Mbits, my Bluetooth HTPC keyboard/mouse would start getting irritating slowdowns, making it unusable. To my surprise changing to Ethernet fixed that.


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TAZ427

Elite Guru
Nov 29, 2007
5,303
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Sugar Land, TX
#21
[QUOTE="MjW, post: 6198755]Wireless can be setup to perform as good as ethernet in many situations, as long as the home you are living is ideal, placement of the router correct, and you choose the best components.

When I had the PC I was at 2-3 ping with speeds around 90-120Mbit. Ethernet had the same ping but throughput was at 100%, stable 200Mbits, my connection at the time.

It also solved other "wireless problems". For example, when I was wirelessly downloading torrents at ~100Mbits, my Bluetooth HTPC keyboard/mouse would start getting irritating slowdowns, making it unusable. To my surprise changing to Ethernet fixed that.


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk HD[/QUOTE]

Yeah, I've observed the same thing. Stable > 200Mbps between my Router and an AP Gateway w/ PCs direct connected on either end. My Laptops and PCs over WiFi directly to each other get ~120Mbps as they aren't dual channel.

That's a bit interesting on torrents. I haven't run into the problem, but then again I'm only paying for a 25Mbps DL rate so my external connection is limited there and I haven't had any problems.
 

F34R

Legend
Feb 11, 2008
40,323
432
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South Carolina
#22
I run everything wireless right now. When the next gen systems are launching I'll have already wired my entire house for Ethernet connections in every room. ;)
 

keefy

Supreme Veteran
Nov 18, 2007
18,982
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The Sock Gap
#23
Anyone use Cat 6 cable? Is it worth it?

Surely ISPs are going to have to start providing Gigabit routers at the moment my ISP provided router only has 1 Gigabit port the rest are 100MBit.
 
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chriharr

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Jun 9, 2011
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#24
[QUOTE="keefy, post: 6199369]Anyone use Cat 6 cable? Is it worth it?

Surely ISPs are going to have to start providing Gigabit routers at the moment my ISP provided router only has 1 Gigabit port the rest are 100MBit.[/QUOTE]

As far as what I've been told by people you can use a Cat5 cable and still get 1,000mbps connection without any problems, CAT 6 cables are the only cables compatible with the new 10,000Mbps which will become the next biggest upgrade in the next 4-5 years it's basically the new Gigabit Ethernet we're all using today.

CAT 5 cables will be fine, CAT 6 some are higher quality made when you pull them apart and notice the different, the main thing is don't go buying cheap and nasty cables for $1 etc, spend a little but not a lot
 

MonkeyClaw

Elite Guru
Oct 18, 2006
5,040
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#26
[QUOTE="chriharr, post: 6199378]As far as what I've been told by people you can use a Cat5 cable and still get 1,000mbps connection without any problems, CAT 6 cables are the only cables compatible with the new 10,000Mbps which will become the next biggest upgrade in the next 4-5 years it's basically the new Gigabit Ethernet we're all using today.

CAT 5 cables will be fine, CAT 6 some are higher quality made when you pull them apart and notice the different, the main thing is don't go buying cheap and nasty cables for $1 etc, spend a little but not a lot[/QUOTE]

As long as you have CAT 5E cabling you will be fine for 1Gbps speeds, I am glad I thought ahead when I had my house built back in '07 though, had every room wired with CAT 6 cabling, so bring on the 10Gbps speeds!

[QUOTE="keefy, post: 6199369]Anyone use Cat 6 cable? Is it worth it?

Surely ISPs are going to have to start providing Gigabit routers at the moment my ISP provided router only has 1 Gigabit port the rest are 100MBit.[/QUOTE]

I use CAT6 wiring at my house, and as of today you won't notice a different between CAT6 and CAT5E (unless you have lots of money), but when 10Gbps routers/switches/NICs drop in price down the road, that is when I will start to benefit from my wiring.

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16833122542

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16833106043
 
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MjW

Forum Sage
Oct 30, 2006
7,873
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#28
[QUOTE="TAZ427, post: 6199184]Yeah, I've observed the same thing. Stable > 200Mbps between my Router and an AP Gateway w/ PCs direct connected on either end. My Laptops and PCs over WiFi directly to each other get ~120Mbps as they aren't dual channel.

That's a bit interesting on torrents. I haven't run into the problem, but then again I'm only paying for a 25Mbps DL rate so my external connection is limited there and I haven't had any problems.[/QUOTE]

~120mbit on local network is not bad at all actually.

[QUOTE="F34R, post: 6199235]I run everything wireless right now. When the next gen systems are launching I'll have already wired my entire house for Ethernet connections in every room. ;)[/QUOTE]

I'm so jealous. Wifi is good enough for simple set ups but when devices are adding up and all want to download big files and fast, you can experience unnecessary problems.

[QUOTE="MonkeyClaw, post: 6199868]As long as you have CAT 5E cabling you will be fine for 1Gbps speeds, I am glad I thought ahead when I had my house built back in '07 though, had every room wired with CAT 6 cabling, so bring on the 10Gbps speeds!



I use CAT6 wiring at my house, and as of today you won't notice a different between CAT6 and CAT5E (unless you have lots of money), but when 10Gbps routers/switches/NICs drop in price down the road, that is when I will start to benefit from my wiring.

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16833122542

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16833106043[/QUOTE]
That is some serious future-proofing.
In 20 years time you will have faster network than Tom Cruise in Minority Report. lol


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MonkeyClaw

Elite Guru
Oct 18, 2006
5,040
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#30
[QUOTE="MjW, post: 6200013]
That is some serious future-proofing.
In 20 years time you will have faster network than Tom Cruise in Minority Report. lol


On the move with Tapatalk[/QUOTE]

Yeah, it is probably extreme overkill, but when there were running the all the lines, I specifically bought a 1000' roll of CAT6 and asked them to run that instead of their cabling, the only suck-ass thing is that I had to add the RJ-45 CAT6 jacks and plugs to the ends of the cables which took some time! But in the end it all worked out, below is a picture of the closet in my office where everything is run to. I couldn't figure out a better way to handle the cables, so I just cut a section out of the wall panel door.