Musical Levels?

Digary

Superior Member
Nov 30, 2008
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Grimsby/Sheffield
#1
Anybody have any idea how these are actually done? I havnt the foggiest and i would like to try one athough im sure i would fail because it would take a fair bit of skill xD

Sorry if this has already been posted but i had a quick look and didnt see anything on the subject
 

Lulz4Food

Apprentice
Nov 26, 2008
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#2
Looks like they use the individual note sounds tuned whatever song is going to be played. They are tripped with magnetic switches. As Sackboy passes each switch the notes play. For multiple notes you see more than on sound stacked. This is sort of a simple answer so I hope you get the idea.
 

Ambassador

Dedicated Member
Aug 27, 2007
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#3
Depends. You need to know a lot about music, and / or have a musical instrument handy (and know how to use it).

Best thing to do is to go to start> Small (or medium, large) grid. You make blocks for all 8th notes. Make sure they're pretty close to each other (a couple of grid blocks recommended) Make a few measures worth of notes / blocks (you can clone the blocks).

Then you put a key on something you're pushing, or something that is moseying on down the level (best if the area is level / straight). Then you put a musical instrument speaker, and a proximity sensor on each block (or do all of that first, and then clone all the blocks)...

Connect the proximity sensors to the speakers, and check the radius on the proximity sensor. Make sure that the key will travel within that radii.

Then you push the key (or you use a motorized cart or something) past the proximity sensors and then each of the speakers will sound.

Now, the trick to make the music, is that you have to choose your instrument for each speaker, and the note (or "modifier) is chosen for each speaker (or depending the timing on your song, you won't need to make each 8th note sound).

The problem with musical levels on LBP is that each note needs to be figured out because it is just a modifier. Meaning you would have to "guess" what note it is. That's where your musical instrument comes in - you will need to use it to judge what note it is on the modifier.

Then you have harmony notes, but that's basically adding more speakers and maybe more sensors (especially if you have 16th notes). Then there's drums and what-not...

Anyway, it is really difficult. I have a small level called Jingle Bells 2008 and it took me so long to do. Yet, the song is only about 25 seconds long if that.
 

spy966

Superior Member
Jan 23, 2008
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#4
What he said :rolleyes:

It's basicly like any patternbased music software except it's done in LBP, wich takes some extra patience and time......

I've done the first part of orion by metallica and after the first solo/melody part the track is like miles long hehe. I guess I could have used smaller blocks :)
The "wall" with all the blocks stacked on top of eachother is high as hell too since I used drums, guitars (rythm and melody with different voices) and bass.

Sometimes it can be difficult to hear if the pitch is exactly correct since you don't have anything to compare to when changing the notes one at the time. So it's alot easyer if you have an instrument, like Ambassador said. I used a guitar.
Also I find it good to color the blocks depending on the "Intrument" and to create a long block witch is like 4/4th long (or 4/6 or whatever you are creating) and put the other blocks on top of that to keep a better structure. (I hope anyone gets what i'm babbling about)
 

Ambassador

Dedicated Member
Aug 27, 2007
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#5
[QUOTE="spy966, post: 0] (I hope anyone gets what i'm babbling about)[/quote]
Probably just as much as people understood me! It's really difficult and you said that it's like any pattern based music software, but if you had to build the software yourself! Which makes it even more difficult.

I just wish they would name the notes on the instrument in the game - it would make things SO MUCH easier than having to try to match the note in the game with a particular note on a musical instrument!