[OT] Dragon Quest Heroes: The World Tree's Woe and the Blight Below

AsterPhoenix

Elite Member
Aug 21, 2008
2,166
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#61
Well the sales are good but I think some other Dragon Quest games sold more in their first week.
Dragon Quest selling more on PS3 isn't too surprising some people in Japan are unsure whether to jump ship to PS4.
More PS4 consoles sold though.
 

Vyse

Extreme Poster
Mar 27, 2006
26,804
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#62
I read it might have something to do with it not being the right time for Japan to buy new consoles because of the economy. Although you're right that the game definitely boosted PS4 sales that week.

Speaking of the Japanese release, anyone here imported the game who can give their impressions?
 

AsterPhoenix

Elite Member
Aug 21, 2008
2,166
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#63
Here's some footage of Psaro first part of the video he's a boss in some form and then the next half is a playable segment.[video=youtube;VVGhGTVjWKY]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VVGhGTVjWKY[/video]
That sounds interesting about the economy side of things have to look into that. Do know that Japan has a birth crisis.
 

Vyse

Extreme Poster
Mar 27, 2006
26,804
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#64
Thanks for posting, mate. Psaro looks like he'd make an awesome addition to the party.
 

Vyse

Extreme Poster
Mar 27, 2006
26,804
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#66
I'm guessing you unlock him as a playable ally when defeating him as a boss. Since he's introduced through DLC, he probably won't say anything during the main game though I could be wrong.

As for the video walkthroughs, I'll have to pass. It's tempting but while I don't understand Japanese, I still want to keep a lot of what happens in the game a secret until it releases in the west later this year.
 
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Vyse

Extreme Poster
Mar 27, 2006
26,804
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#68
Hey, guys. I'm sorry I haven't been updating this recently as I've been offline this past week. Here's the trailer for the free DLC of Terry's sub-story:

[video=youtube;tChY7iuLijY]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tChY7iuLijY[/video]

Please feel free to post any updates here if I miss them.
 

Tactical

Apprentice
Aug 7, 2014
489
8
0
#69
Dragon Quest Heroes 2 announced it seems. From PSLifestyle...

Even though Dragon Quest Heroes still has yet to come west, Square Enix has announced that Dragon Quest Heroes 2 is already in development for PlayStation 4, PS3, and PS Vita.

According to a translation by NeoGAF user duckroll, the Japanese Dragon Quest Heroes website held a little teaser campaign recently that asked players to click on 100 slimes, saying that a special announcement would be made when a combined total of 10 million slimes were clicked on.

Apparently, that number has been reached, and Square Enix’s surprise announcement was the reveal of Dragon Quest Heroes 2, which is currently in development. While there was some speculation on NeoGAF as to whether or not the reveal was some type of April Fool’s joke, it seems to be the real deal, considering the announcement is still up even though it is April 2nd in Japan at the time this article was written. Are you getting excited?

[Source: Dragon Quest Heroes via NeoGAF]


Wooh.
 

Christopher

Community and Technical Manager
Staff member
Jun 1, 2007
11,960
113
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50
Newnan, GA
#70
http://www.eurogamer.net/articles/2015-04-07-dragon-quest-heroes-review

Eurogamer Review

Omega Force, the Japanese studio that popularised the outlandish 1 vs 10,000 historical battle simulator, has been mounting a novel strategy of late, one designed to lure players who have tired of (or stayed entirely away from) the Dynasty Warriors series onto the virtual battlefield. Hyrule Warriors was the studio's first alliance with a hitherto unrelated video game series, a successful sojourn into to the Zelda universe in the so-called 'Musou' style. There you played as one of Nintendo's velvety mascots, pirouetting about caverns and fields, attempting to control the ebb and flow of two opposing armies in a series of battles staged in familiar Hyrule. Now, with Dragon Quest Heroes, the studio has invaded an equally cherished and storied mythology, pitting a squadron of warriors from Square Enix's RPG series against illustrator Akira Toriyama's equally loveable enemy forces.

If Hyrule Warriors represented a softening of Omega Force's usual brittle style, in Dragon Quest Heroes the makeover is complete. Dragon Quest's cartoon aesthetic has been fully upheld. This is a grime-less world, its bright primary colours edged with resplendent gold. The sun sits immovable at high noon throughout the story, while the bouncing enemies (grinning blobs of slime, adorable miniature knights riding space hoppers, dragons you could curl up with as comfort toys) swipe at you, at all times maintaining cheery smiles. The tone is so relentlessly jolly you'll wonder why you can't call the whole thing off and settle down with a picnic to admire the view of the twinkling sea together instead. But beneath the joyous presentation, Omega Force's warmongering engine still purrs, hungrily.
Many of the series' best-loved bosses make cameos, now blown up to full scale, with their full repertoire of combat moves.

You play as one of clutch of different heroes. Acht and Mehr are swordfighters (one boy, one girl) who fit the usual Dragon Quest protagonist's profile: young, quick and coiffured. Dirk, by contrast, is a hulk of a heavy-hitting king, able to clear great swathes of space with a sweep of his staff. Julietta, the fourth character in the starting line-up, is a mage who supports her team with strikes from her weaponised boomerang and the odd healing spell. As the game's story unfurls, you unlock other characters, most of who are taken from previous titles in the series, including fan favourites such as Jessica, Yangus and Meena.
Characters share a control scheme (and melee combos almost always end in a splash of combat magic, regardless of who you're controlling), but have wildly different move-sets, strengths and weaknesses and skill trees, which can be pruned to suit your tastes as you level each character up (as well as new moves you can spend points to unlock other abilities, and stat boosts). Contrary to most Musou games, you are able to switch between four chosen characters mid-battle. All characters appear on the battlefield at all times, with the computer controlling the supporting three roles. Generally you'll stick with your favourite avatar but the ability to leap between options can be useful for clearing distance quickly, or, if the AI is loitering, for issuing the odd support spell from a secondary character, or a screen-wrecking special move.
Multi-character control on the battlefield is just the first change to what represents a significant overhaul of the Musou template. The battles are far shorter than in any other Omega Force title to date. And while you must still defeat enemy generals now you must also, almost without exception, defend a home point from attack. Rather than working your way across the battlefield, claiming new areas to your army's side, the game becomes a more straightforward negotiation between attack and defence, in which you strike out to eliminate an enemy commander, before rapidly retreating to fend off attacking forces that have gathered around your home point. Most battles are finished in a great deal less than 15 minutes.
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There is no English option in the Japanese-only release. You'll need at least a basic knowledge of Japanese kana to negotiate the menus.

To add a layer of strategy to this more simplistic approach, you can now deploy minions to join in the fight, either as stationed defenders near your home point, or questing attackers, who trigger area-clearing special moves. Minions are represented by collectible coins, dropped by fallen enemies. Once you have the coin you can deploy a friendly version of the unit at will. While you have six minion slots to fill, more powerful minions will take up more than one slot. This leads to some micromanagement strategy, as you must choose how to balance your supporting monsters: with safety in numbers, or a couple of more powerful options. Later in the game it's possible to teleport around the battlefield between warp crystals, and mounted turrets provide further offensive possibilities.
Dragon Quest's familiar props and metaphors are maintained throughout: die during battle and you'll be resurrected in the local chapel, the same place at which you can save your game's progress. After the game's lingering introduction, you gain access to an airship (complete with a high street's worth of stores, and, ludicrously, the chapel itself), which you direct around a world map (it dutifully follows your cursor) while you choose where to land. Items can be combined in a stewing pot to create new goods and there's a side-quest desk at which you can pick-up a seemingly endless supply of extra-curricular missions: all familiar designs to Dragon Quest veterans. There are other neat flourishes, such as the ability to convert each of the game's 49 unlockable trophies into awards and power-ups, and the ripple of distant applause that encourages you every time you do something notable on the battlefield.
Omega Force celebrates Dragon Quest's rich and vibrant universe, and the quick-fire missions offer a welcome change of pace to a style of game that's synonymous with drawn out battles that can last more than an hour a time. But valuable things have been lost in the restructuring too. Combat lacks the pace and punch for which Dynasty Warriors et al are known. And in the more direct back and forth of offence and defence play, the sense of being a just one element in a storm of combat is lost. This is, as Square Enix labels it, more of a traditional action RPG than a churning battlefield simulator. Omega Force may gain some new supporters to its cause, but something vital has been traded in the endeavour.
 

DarkVincent07

Trying not to break stuff...
Mar 4, 2008
17,313
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Sydney
#73
[QUOTE="Metal King Slime, post: 6441361]Western release has an english subtitle: The World Tree's Woe and the Blight Below.[/QUOTE]

Really strange, since the Japanese release didn't even have one. But I really like the sound of it, it sounds so mythical and lovely
 

Vyse

Extreme Poster
Mar 27, 2006
26,804
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#74
Hey, guys! I forgot to post this earlier but you can fight Zoma from Dragon Warrior III in the game's 5th free DLC! Check it out below! As a big fan of Dragon Warrior III myself, I really hope we get the opportunity to play this bonus content for ourselves.

[video=youtube;PuxhQULFpfc]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PuxhQULFpfc[/video]

You can skip to the 5-minute mark for the gameplay.

Other than that, have you guys read anything about the western release's release date yet?
 
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Teetie

Apprentice
May 2, 2015
210
1
0
#75
I've still not played a Dragon Quest game but this is looking rather pretty. Which will we get first out of this or DQ8 on 3DS?
 

Vyse

Extreme Poster
Mar 27, 2006
26,804
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#76
[QUOTE="Teetie, post: 6445863]I've still not played a Dragon Quest game but this is looking rather pretty. Which will we get first out of this or DQ8 on 3DS?[/QUOTE]
I'm guessing Dragon Quest Heroes will come first this year and Dragon Quest VIII 3DS sometime next year. Localization always takes a while.

[QUOTE="DarkVincent07, post: 6441593]Really strange, since the Japanese release didn't even have one. But I really like the sound of it, it sounds so mythical and lovely[/QUOTE]
Actually, I think the Japanese subtitle is "The Dark Dragon and the World Tree Castle" but that doesn't sound as good, in my opinion. The Western subtitle has a nicer ring to it, like you said, mythical and lovely.
 
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Vyse

Extreme Poster
Mar 27, 2006
26,804
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#77
By the way, I haven't seen this posted so here's PlayStation Lifestyle's review:



The most important part of any Warriors-style game is the combat. And yes, this is a Warriors game. Square Enix calls it an action RPG because the company is afraid people will roll their eyes at the thought of “another Musou game,” which is an understandable fear. I don’t like many Dynasty Warriors games, but I love Dragon Quest Heroes. If I’d gone by the genre alone, I may have missed out on what turned out to be my favorite game in recent memory. To call the game an action RPG isn’t inaccurate, either.

Take an action RPGs three-or-four-hit combo foundation, add occasional use of tower defense systems, plus massive swarms of enemies and you’ve got Dragon Quest Heroes. Slimes, wizards, stone men, trolls, and all kinds of classics from the nearly 30-year-old series show up by the truckload for your smashing pleasure. And yes, most importantly, regardless of all these silly genre definitions, Dragon Quest Heroes is indeed a pleasure.

Combat never felt like a bore, in my 40-hour initial playthrough or any of the messing around with New Game Plus. I looked forward to it when away, and could hardly put it down when in game. It combines the best of Warriors games and Dragon Quest-ish growth systems. Characters gain levels and skills at just the right speed, preventing the game from getting too dull. While stages will almost always involve wiping out hordes of bad guys, different objectives spice it up.

Naturally, the group must at times wipe a map clear of monsters. Other times, they might have to fight their way from Point A to Point B. Others still, they’ll protect a specific place or person. Since this will also involve smashing monster portals located all over the map, these requires strategic planning and fast movement.

Some monsters will drop coins, allowing the team to collect them and use some as special attacks, others as NPC allies. Deciding where to plant them is another fun part of the strategy in Dragon Quest Heroes.



But hold the fuck on, this shit gets better. There’s more fun to be had in rapidly switching characters and tossing out specials left and right. Boom! Now I’m Terry doing lightning shit; boom! Then I’m Jessica dropping a huge explosion; boom! Then I’m Yangus and I’ve gotta axe you some questions; then I’m back to my main hero and about to close this bitch out with a bang. I hope you understand that it is taking all of my willpower to not throw my laptop out the window and go back to playing right now.

Rewards back at base make the battles feel all the more worthwhile. Each character earns skill points with levels, and each has his/her own skill table table on which to spend the points. These have new skills, upgrades to existing skills, and stat boosts. While late-game characters will probably look very similar across everyone’s playthroughs due to having bought nearly everything, the table allows good agency.



Want to spend your points on stat boosts right now? Do that. Skills? Okay, do that instead. Spend on a bunch of little upgrades, or save up for the big expensive thing? Your choice. The ability to re-spec any time eliminates potential regret. On each skill table, a few spaces are reserved for certain levels or based upon already having checked a previous square, but for the most part, DQH‘s Skill Point upgrades allow non-linear, decision-based upgrades.

You go. I Got Your Six

The three allies not being controlled directly will operate under great A.I. In the early going, I noticed some party members standing idly, right in front of an enemy, while I did the work. They may appear to be dead weight, but keep in mind that if they’re out there cutting loose, it might not let the player feel as satisfied. In developing a game like this, you have to let your players feel empowered. If they don’t, the game is boring and they don’t come back.

When the number of enemies goes up, so does the aggression of allies. Don’t worry, they don’t just sit around dragging their feet the whole time. When you’re surrounded, they’ll get right in there and start slashing, and against bosses, they’ll be right in the thick of the fight. The only thing they won’t do is use their unique Tension moves, which is understandable. Those take so much time to build up that it’s more efficient and effective to let the human player use those.



Adjustable difficulty levels with some modifiable A.I. might have been nice. Perhaps if those swarms of enemies were just a little tougher, the idle moments wouldn’t come up? I’m probably asking questions the dev team already asked, however. This seems like the kind of thing they’d mess with. Still, the important point is that as it is, Dragon Quest Heroes has some good A.I. companions. Several times during my play, I quickly switched to Jessica to use her healing spell Hustle Dance, and found that the dance was already underway. Nice, eh?

I’m Afraid I Can’t Do That, Dave

Time goes by, genre lines blur, but Dragon Quest has certain things built into its DNA. For better or worse, its interfaces tend toward inefficiency and the series as a whole maintains a reputation for requiring a level grind. Thankfully, in Dragon Quest Heroes, I didn’t have to grind at all. There were plenty of times, however, when I would joyfully indulge in side content. I did it because it was fun, not because I had to, and therefore, no grind.



The interface problem, meanwhile, resurfaces. It feels like different people programmed different menus, and they hardly ever talked to each other. In some shop menus, you’ll have to sell items one at a time, even if you have 10 of them. In others, you can sell the whole lot. When buying items with medals, there’s no option to buy more than one at a time.

You need three blue flowers to make those shoes at the alchemy pot? Get ready to select Buy, then scroll all the way down through dozens (hundreds?) of items, select the flower, hit O, hit up, hit O again to confirm, then start over.



Then you head over to the church to recharge your healing stones. Well, fuck, time to recharge them one at a time. Why is there no option to select them all, then select a charge level, then confirm? After a boss battle in which I used all of my healing stones, I got the five (at the time) recharged, which took 49 seconds. Basically 10 seconds per stone, and yet you have to do them individually. It doesn’t sound like much until you sit through it.

In 2015, recharging the whole pack should take no more than five seconds in total. But no, you need to select the stone, select the charge level, then watch the first stone begin to glow, then listen to fanfare, then continue to individually recharge each stone with the same process, thankfully minus the cinema. Why not include the ability for individual recharges, but also a blanket “Recharge X amount to ____ level” option? Weird menu hangups like this boggle the mind.

Warning: Graphic Content

This is the best a Dragon Quest game has ever looked. While generally not named among a given system’s “best” graphics, Dragon Quest has always had bright, colorful, impressive artwork. I always felt like every game looked as good as it could have, all things considered. This new PS4 game, however, easily becomes the franchise’s best-looking entry to date. Characters, enemies, and environments are gorgeous, and the frame rate stays steady even during the most furious combat. Only the most minor hiccups occurred, and only in town or during a few select CG cinemas. That was it.

Dragon Quest‘s outstanding artwork is really brought to life by the visuals in Heroes, and its classic characters become so much more likeable with their comical interactions and voice acting. Seeing characters from all across the DQ universe make snappy conversations with each other as they fight through this new and strange situation actually excites me to go back and finish some of the Dragon Quest RPGs I never quite finished; I feel like I know the characters better. The whole universe is given new life in this game. It feels amazing to be in it.



The only annoying visual bit was the stupid bubble on top that periodically tells me I’m not signed into the PSN. Yeah, I get it. I know I’m not signed into the PSN. That’s kind of intentional, game. Leave me alone.

Musical Memories

Audio in DQH is serviceable enough for series newcomers, and will likely delight longtime fans. Little fanfares and remixed or rearranged songs appear throughout, which fans will recognize and surely smile. Familiar sound effects for things like getting treasures and leveling up pluck the old nostalgia strings. It would have been nice to have a few more battle tracks, but what’s there is good.

“No One Tops Me in Magic or Style!”

Music and monsters aren’t the only nostalgia blasts in Dragon Quest Heroes. The cast is made up of familiar faces from around the series and a handful of original characters. Dialogue can at times be hilarious, especially among the two new main heroes. It’s really a credit to the writers that they took this ensemble cast of characters from different games and made them work so well together.



The story is lighthearted, basic, and of course loaded with cliches, but they’re all done so well that it doesn’t matter. It helps that this isn’t a genre from which I expect a riveting tale, anyway. Cast members are as different on the battlefield as they are in conversation, making them interesting all around. Later on, it became hard to pick which characters to take with me; I loved them all and could hardly decide.

Some free DLC is already available, more is coming in the next few days. Players can add a character, quests, and costumes.

Speaking of online stuff, this game is just begging for multiplayer. It’s an outstanding game as is, but some multiplayer — preferably from the couch — might send it into the stratosphere. Deciding which friend would stay back and guard the gate from an onslaught while the other charged ahead to destroy the spawn point could make for awesome nights with friends and siblings, but it wasn’t to be. Shucks.

Dragon Quest‘s Level Increases!

Square Enix took the Dragon Quest series a little further from its roots than its ever been with this game, but the move was a good one. While this will undoubtedly bring on justified cries for a traditional Dragon Quest RPG on the PS4, Dragon Quest Heroes is an excellent game in its own right. It blends genres for incredible fun while making an old nostalgic series look and feel better than ever.

9/10
http://www.playstationlifestyle.net/2015/03/08/dragon-quest-heroes-review-ps4-warriors/
 

Vyse

Extreme Poster
Mar 27, 2006
26,804
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#79
Europe release date has also been announced as October 16, 2015.

Character names have been translated: Luceus, Aurora, Noric and Isla. There are a couple more edits that I need to make in the OP following the game's translation.

Watch the new trailer below.

[video=youtube;Veul9Q8R9fw]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Veul9Q8R9fw[/video]

Slime Collector's Edition detailed:



- Slime Plushie, Slime Key Chain and Slime Lanyard.
- Helpful Slime-themed downloadable content for characters to equip including a Slime Sword, Gooey Gloves, Goomerang, Goopid’s Bow, Squishing Rod, Gungenir, Slime-on-a-Stick, Gooreat Sword and Splat O’Nine Tails.
- Bonus quest items, including the Gold-digger’s Map and Happy Map.
 
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Vyse

Extreme Poster
Mar 27, 2006
26,804
361
83
#80
Destructoid posted a preview recently, which wasn't for a new demo of the game if you've been following my thread from the beginning but nonetheless positive.

Having spent Too Many Hours with Hyrule Warriors, I was worried I'd be tapped out for Omega Force's next big spinoff, Dragon Quest Heroes. Well, maybe not worried. These games chip away at your life for months on end, and alluring as they are, I'd ideally rather split my time between a bunch of smaller, more fulfilling experiences than one huge, fun-but-eventually-repetitive game.

After playing a pair of levels at a pre-E3 event, I've realized there's no escaping my fate. I'm in.

Here in the West, the game's full title is Dragon Quest Heroes: The World Tree's Woe and the Blight Below. I'm telling you that now because I can't hold it in any longer. So silly. But also fun to say out loud (in the privacy of your home where strangers can't hear you being a weirdo).

The first level I tried was not the first level of the game, but it was straightforward enough: slay all of the monsters. They're so darn cute! My history with Dragon Quest spans one title, Sentinels of the Starry Sky, so my connection to "iconic" series characters is tenuous at best. But I do love Akira Toriyama's creature designs, and that's a sufficient starting point for this game.

Coming off of Hyrule Warriors, combat in Dragon Quest Heroes feels slower, more deliberate. Strategic. You can swap between four party members at any time, each with their own HP, MP, spells, and abilities. Land enough hits, and you'll fill a gauge that will put your hero into a souped-up state. In this lax early level, juggling characters effectively wasn't crucial for success, but that was definitely the case for the session's next stage, a battle against the towering Gigantes.

The idea is to hop into cannons and shoot the cyclops straight in the you-know-where to put it into a downed state, then mash away while it's vulnerable. Don't let it destroy everything. Easy.

But the beast had such an absurdly large pool of health that defeating it within the time limit seemed impossible. Matter of fact, after losing, I asked the Square Enix rep just to make sure. The fight was technically possible, he said. Guess I need to work on my strategy and timing. (Or grind?) Either way, the battle should be easier at home with the finished game.

Much to my dismay, the demo ended right there. I didn't get to see the town hub. Or character upgrades. Or the story. Or monster medals, which are dropped by fallen foes and can be used to summon them onto the battlefield to fight for your side. For the purposes of writing this preview, that lack of first-hand experience is unfortunate, but the tease has ratcheted up my interest considerably. Dragon Quest Heroes is already out in Japan, so inquiring minds can see as much or as little footage as they want ahead of the October 13, 2015 release for PS4 in North America.

Between all the familiar music, sound effects, and faces, Dragon Quest fans are going to feel at home here. It was a warm, happy, inviting place, even for me. Combat flows more like a role-playing game and skirmishes feel smaller and simpler, but that's not inherently bad. It's just different. After a few hundred hours of Hyrule Warriors, yeah, I could go for something different.
Source
 

Vyse

Extreme Poster
Mar 27, 2006
26,804
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#81
RPGamer have also posted their first impression of the game.

Fresh off last year's Hyrule Warriors, Koei Tecmo's Omega Force developer is back with another hack-and-slash game based off a popular franchise. Dragon Quest Heroes aims to take Dragon Quest's colorful characters and apply them to a familiar Omega Force form and add in some RPG elements. I recently got the chance to play several hours of Dragon Quest Heroes thanks to an import copy on PS4. While it certainly is good news to see that a new Dragon Quest game will be headed to the West, my time with the game left me less than impressed.

The game starts off letting the player name both a male and female protagonist before some other original characters join up. Players can select between the two protagonists, but as far as I could tell this seemed meaningless, as they were both available for use for the duration of my playtime. Players can also choose between two control styles: the traditional hack-and-slash style where combos are created by mixing two different attack buttons and another where players can simply hold down the attack button. The latter seems intended for those with less experience with action games, which is a bit odd since similar titles already have simple controls. The new control scheme doesn't work very well either, and didn't seem to allow for much in the way of combo control.

Thankfully, the traditional control scheme works well. Characters have a variety of combos, often ending in some classic Dragon Quest spells. The game does use an MP system, and these skills can be activated at any time, not just at the end of combos, which provides some extra utility. Outside of that, the game mostly felt like a typical Warriors game with just a few added features. For starters, the player has a party of four characters which can be switched up between missions from the currently available roster. Party members don't wander off on their own, but instead stay together to let players swap between characters on the fly.

Game progression also mixes in some RPG elements, as new equipment becomes available after certain intervals and can be purchased from the player's home base (which is a flying airship) between missions. Characters gain experience and level up as one might expect, and story sequences and new characters pop up as things move along. There's no real exploration or anything else RPG related, as progression is just a matter of completing missions selected from a static world map. Players can wander around the airship and talk to various NPCs between missions as well to break up the monotony.

This is all well and good, but Dragon Quest Heroes still seems to feel a bit lacking. The missions I played were relatively straightforward, and at times, boring. Battlefields were relatively small and missions seemed to mostly revolve around protecting a stationary point. It is possible that these repetitive missions are simply introductions intended to show off the games mechanics before getting more varied deeper in. One specific new mechanic is the ability to summon monsters to help in a battle. Some monsters will drop cards which can then be used to summon that monster in the current mission. This came quite in handy as these early missions involved taking out imps that controlled portals which let in a never ending supply of enemies. There's no real control beyond dropping the monster on the field and letting them go to town, and it isn't always clear that they are a friendly monster which leads to wasting time accidentally hacking away at a friendly minion.

While my time with the game was certainly fun, I couldn't help but feel a bit disappointed. Without the depth and extra modes that made Hyrule Warriors so fun, Dragon Quest Heroes felt a bit lacking. The combat also stuck pretty close to other Omega Force games, which made it feel like it was little more than Dynasty Warriors with a Dragon Quest coat of paint on it. It will take playing through the entire game to get a full measure of it, and despite my reservations there still is a lot to like. It's just good to see a new Dragon Quest game heading to the West.
Source
 
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Vyse

Extreme Poster
Mar 27, 2006
26,804
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#82
Here's a recent article worth reading where the game's producer talks about Dragon Quest Heroes not being another Dynasty Warriors game.

After playing some Dragon Quest Heroes in Square Enix’s E3 booth, I had the chance to speak with Ryota Aomi, the game’s producer. I asked him how Omega Force approached Dragon Quest Heroes compared to other Warriors titles they’ve worked on.

“Well, for example, with Hyrule Warriors, what we really set out to create was a Zelda game that was a Warriors game—one that really felt like it was close to the Warriors name,” he replied.

Aomi is talking about a decision made by Shigeru Miyamoto in which he “flipped the table,” insisting that Koei Tecmo producer Yosuke Hayashi make Hyrule Warriors a Warriors game with Zelda elements, instead of vice-versa.

“The way we thought about Dragon Quest Heroes was quite different. Rather than try to create a Warriors game that featured characters from another franchise, we wanted to create a Dragon Quest game that had become an action RPG,” Aomi said to Siliconera.

“So, in that sense, it’s an evolution of the Dragon Quest series and not necessarily a Warriors game. They may look very similar, but we feel that the core of the game is very different.”

Aomi made one final comment before closing the question: “People are always going to think that when Koei Tecmo makes a game like this, it’ll just be another Warriors game—that’s unavoidable. I just want to reiterate that it was not designed to be just another Warriors game.”
Source
 

Vyse

Extreme Poster
Mar 27, 2006
26,804
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#83
Here's some gameplay from E3 2015:

[video=youtube;9ab9UOrZlAI]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9ab9UOrZlAI[/video]
 

Vyse

Extreme Poster
Mar 27, 2006
26,804
361
83
#87
[QUOTE="AsterPhoenix, post: 6456612]Seen the E3 footage but haven't found any with english voices. Will they use a british dub or a us dub?[/QUOTE]
I've read that Yangus' english voice actor, Ricky Grover, is back again for Dragon Quest Heroes. I don't know if Emma Ferguson is voicing Jessica again. You can also hear the main villain speak in the Begin a New Quest trailer a couple posts up though he doesn't say much.

In any case, the Western version will also come with Japanese voices if you don't happen to like the English voices.
 

AsterPhoenix

Elite Member
Aug 21, 2008
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#88
[QUOTE="Metal King Slime, post: 6456874]I've read that Yangus' english voice actor, Ricky Grover, is back again for Dragon Quest Heroes. I don't know if Emma Ferguson is voicing Jessica again. You can also hear the main villain speak in the Begin a New Quest trailer a couple posts up though he doesn't say much.

In any case, the Western version will also come with Japanese voices if you don't happen to like the English voices.[/QUOTE]

That's good news least likely he may return for future Yangus roles. Was unsure with VA depending on Square with localisation budget etc. Yeah I heard the villain speak in the first trailer I couldn't make out who it was either.

I don't mind either can play with english voice but if it get's really bad like Star Ocean the Last Hope i'll play it in Japanese.
Interested who they will cast for the rest of the characters.
 

Vyse

Extreme Poster
Mar 27, 2006
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#89
[QUOTE="AsterPhoenix, post: 6457044]That's good news least likely he may return for future Yangus roles. Was unsure with VA depending on Square with localisation budget etc. Yeah I heard the villain speak in the first trailer I couldn't make out who it was either.

I don't mind either can play with english voice but if it get's really bad like Star Ocean the Last Hope i'll play it in Japanese.
Interested who they will cast for the rest of the characters.[/QUOTE]
Yeah, the English voices will probably turn out alright. I think I would like listening to Japanese voices more if I understood the language as it was being spoken though since simply reading the dialogue isn't really the same thing.
 

AsterPhoenix

Elite Member
Aug 21, 2008
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#90
[QUOTE="Metal King Slime, post: 6457129]Yeah, the English voices will probably turn out alright. I think I would like listening to Japanese voices more if I understood the language as it was being spoken though since simply reading the dialogue isn't really the same thing.[/QUOTE]

Yeah I would like listening to Japanese more as well if I understood the language but have no problems with subtitles. Yeah Square been good with voice casting directing over the past while.