Parents Television Council Calls Game Industry "Thugs" and "Bullies"

Teraspark

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Nov 4, 2009
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#1
I don't know if this counts as politcal but please delete if necessary.

The Parents Television Council says the videogame industry and its supporters are "thugs" and "bullies" for daring to stand up for their First Amendment rights at the Supreme Court.

The Parents Television Council, a conservative watchdog group dedicated to restoring "responsibility and decency to the entertainment industry," has long supported California's efforts to impose a law regulating the sale of videogames to minors, so with the final step in that process looming, it's not a big surprise that it's cranking up the rhetoric a bit. Even so, its recent column on "Harassment and Half-Truth" is a bit harsh.


"Like the violent thugs which populate so many of the games it sells, the videogame industry has responded to the ongoing court case with vicious attacks," the editorial states. "California State Senator Leland Yee, who introduced the law, has been personally targeted by the videogame industry and various groups they fund."


Senator Yee, as you may recall, was "targeted" by a Video Game Voters Network campaign which called for gamers to write "I support the First Amendment" on their old or broken controllers, then mail them to the Senator to remind him that they won't stand idly by while he attempts to control their media consumption. This "hate mail," as the PTC desrcribed it, "is simply the industry throwing a temper tantrum and trying to intimidate someone who dares to hold them to the standards the gaming industry itself allegedly endorses."
"The videogame industry and those who support them are bullies, plain and simple," it continues. "The PTC urges its members to stand up to the billionaire game companies that profit from selling sex and violence to children."


There's an undeniable irony in the PTC's claim that the videogame industry has "resorted to half-truths to try to make its point," which is rendered somewhat less amusing by the fact that these people may actually get their way, and that in an unprecedented assault on the sanctity of the First Amendment an entire medium may be muzzled, not for what it does, but simply for what it is. Someday, hopefully, we'll be able to look back on this and laugh, but right now it's really not very funny at all.


Oral arguments in Schwarzenegger v. EMA/ESA are scheduled to take place on November 2.
SOURCE

I am so glad that the UK government has some common sense when it comes to industry regulations.
 

Teraspark

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Nov 4, 2009
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#4
[QUOTE="Bostonmess, post: 5238413]Who's side's Swarzeneggar on?[/QUOTE]

The darkside! But seriously, his state government is going forward with this silly law.
 

Zoibie

Supreme Veteran
Jun 18, 2006
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[QUOTE="Teraspark, post: 5238416]The darkside! But seriously, his state government is going forward with this silly law.[/QUOTE]

To be fair, the law itself isn't even as bad as what we have in the UK in terms of the actual stipulations, but it could lead to some even worse Supreme Court cases later on.
 

Zoibie

Supreme Veteran
Jun 18, 2006
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From the little that I know of the US Supreme Court, I'd expect this to go to a 5-4 decision with Justice Kennedy siding with the liberals, but I'm not certain.

Also, funny we're not talking about the article itself, don't think anyone takes them seriously anyway.
 

Vulgotha

Power Member
Jan 6, 2007
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I fail to see the problem.

They card you here in the US. Hell I get carded and I'm 20. I'm 215lbs totally stacked and usually sport a shadow on my face even after shaving.


The majority of the time these kids are obtaining these games FROM their parents\elder siblings. This law isn't going to seriously change "Mature" content from landing in under aged hands.

You want to make a difference parents? Read the ESRB label on the front of the box and then check the back for the reasons behind the rating. After that, go online (you know, that magical black box which accesses google by some form of mysticism or another) and research the game. Find videos, images, reviews, and make a judgment call.

Furthermore, understand that nobody online is going to "hold their tongue" to your (brat) child once they log onto XBL\PSN. Provoked or not.

The power is entirely in your hands whether or not your kid gets the game.

Oh, epic hint from this free strategy guide? Go check your kids room for what games he has you dumbasses- and while you're at it activate parent controls on his unit. Just in case, you know, somehow he acquired a game through means other than you.



Where has personal responsibility gone? Where is maturity and level headed reasoning from parents? A few years back we found out that apparently its cartoon networks fault for unhealthy child eating habits and obesity because they would (surprise) allow child cereals on the air for advertisements.

Because children wander into Supertargets, Walmarts, and Bakers and buy these cereals with their own hard earned cash... Right?
 
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Teraspark

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#10
These pressure groups fail to see or refuse to acknowledge the evidence provided by the industry showing how well it is regulated.

I've been reading off the Video Game Voters Network for some time now and I am convinced that the court will throw the case out.

EDIT: Here's Yahtzee throwing his lot behind VGVN.

[video=youtube;HLsOilplBxk]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HLsOilplBxk&feature=player_embedded#![/video]
 
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VayMasters86

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Sep 13, 2007
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I am so glad that the UK government has some common sense when it comes to industry regulations.
Except when/if(big IF) developers are somehow put into a position where they can't sell certain games in the US and choose to not make the game altogether since just Europe and Japan can't make them a profit.

Evey time I hear about lawsuits like this, it's always about not letting minors purchase "M" rated games. I always thought they were not allowed to buy those games anyways? And yeah, the kid will cry and the parent without a backbone will cave and buy the little **** ant the game anyways.
 

Bigdoggy

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Jan 24, 2008
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All this article is, is for kids under 18 to not purchase M - rated games. I see nothing wrong with this, and if it goes through, I am sure the M-rated games will get a lot better. M-rated = 18+ or older to purchase I believe. So there, you have to be 18 to get it, maybe if this goes through they can make proper M-rated games.

To be fair, if it was brought forth a long time ago to make certain games adult purchases and they didn't do that, it should then be strongly forced. The parents will most likely get them for the kids anyway, but that is accounted for because it is parental supervision. Granted, some parents are not responsible but then there are some parents that don't believe in this hogwash as well. Heck, I was able to watch rated R movies at the age of 6, but that was my mothers decision to let me, I am downright sure if I got out of hand she would have put a stop to that. Even movie rental places let me rent rated R movies, no biggie but then again, I am not a moron running around with a knife stabbing people at that age either.

Some of you should actually read the article instead of second guessing it. It's really not that big of a deal. So they are trying to enforce the law that says you have to be 17 or 18 years old to purchase the game, big whoopdy doo!. Rated R movies also have an age restriction on there purchase as well, remember that.
 
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LfCpS3

Master Poster
May 22, 2009
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A kid is playing a 18 year old game. Whos fault is it? the kids or his parents?

I say they sort out the parents before whining about anything else.

The parents should be responsible for what the kids are doing, weather they like it or not.
 

Teraspark

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#15
[QUOTE="Bigdoggy, post: 5238618]All this article is, is for kids under 18 to not purchase M - rated games. I see nothing wrong with this, and if it goes through, I am sure the M-rated games will get a lot better. M-rated = 18+ or older to purchase I believe. So there, you have to be 18 to get it, maybe if this goes through they can make proper M-rated games.

To be fair, if it was brought forth a long time ago to make certain games adult purchases and they didn't do that, it should then be strongly forced. The parents will most likely get them for the kids anyway, but that is accounted for because it is parental supervision. Granted, some parents are not responsible but then there are some parents that don't believe in this hogwash as well. Heck, I was able to watch rated R movies at the age of 6, but that was my mothers decision to let me, I am downright sure if I got out of hand she would have put a stop to that. Even movie rental places let me rent rated R movies, no biggie but then again, I am not a moron running around with a knife stabbing people at that age either.

Some of you should actually read the article instead of second guessing it. It's really not that big of a deal. So they are trying to enforce the law that says you have to be 17 or 18 years old to purchase the game, big whoopdy doo!. Rated R movies also have an age restriction on there purchase as well, remember that.[/QUOTE]

The problem I see with it, Bigdoggy, is that why should government step on the toes of the industry who probably has the best self-regulatory system in the entertainment business just because some people base their belief that violent video games are connected to a series of unfortunates shootings or flawed studies.

I'm all for the industry-enforced ratings don't get me wrong but why should a government butt in while the system already in place is working properly, albeit, when parents do the right thing and not buy their kids adult games.
 

Fon

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Oct 5, 2009
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#16
[QUOTE="Bigdoggy, post: 5238618]All this article is, is for kids under 18 to not purchase M - rated games. I see nothing wrong with this, and if it goes through, I am sure the M-rated games will get a lot better. M-rated = 18+ or older to purchase I believe. So there, you have to be 18 to get it, maybe if this goes through they can make proper M-rated games. [/QUOTE]Retailers won't stock rated AO games on their shelves.