The bolstered relevancy of exclusives.

Sep 5, 2006
2,537
0
0
33
#1
For starters, I'd like to say that everything said in this is just my opinion, so no matter how matter-of-fact my views and statements may sound, it's my opinion.:cool:

Alrighty...I'd like to begin by saying that I'm not the stereotypical exclusivity Nazi that shuns and scoffs at mutliplatform games. Couldn't be further from the truth, actually. Personally, I've found some SKATE, CoD4, FNR3, and NBA2K7 to be among the most fun games around for the PS3, and I've thoroughly enjoyed them.

The thing is though, many of the good multiplatform games lack the pedigree that contemporary and upcoming exclusives have, and it's very evident upon first glimpse. When you look at games like Uncharted, Heavenly Sword, Ratchet, Killzone, The Getaway, Resistance, Little Big Planet, and many many others, they have a certain je ne sais quoi about them that most multiplats seem to lack. A production quality and ambience that isn't too often replicated anywhere else, and it's not difficult to notice, either.

Once again, this isn't to discredit those great and fun multiplats out there, just pointing out my view that there is a certain noticeable difference between them and exclusives these days. I say these days because it wasn't quite as apparent last generation as it is now, and here's why. Think of the developer studios out there that didn't get their just dues, whether they be financially, critically(bleh), commercially, or in the resources and support departments. Team ICO, Level 5, Atlus, and many others are good examples, but I also feel that some of the admittedly more successful studios like ND and Insomniac didn't quite achieve it either. I felt that some of their best titles didn't stand out, as exclusives, quite as well as they could have in the face of most anything else out there. Heck, even MGS3, for a pretty high profile title, didn't quite recapture the success and recognition of the second one, despite being widely heralded as a return to form for the series. Perhaps that could be attributed to the PS2's immense library as well, but I think the lack of that semblance that exclusives have now contributed to that as well.

Compare that to these days. Everyone recognizes a title like Resistance. Many are pleased by the cinematic qualities displayed by Ratchet, Uncharted, and Heavenly Sword. Games like Killzone 2 and FFXIII have absolutely floored people, and Metal Gear Solid is a global phenomenon in it's own right. Again, one could seriously set these titles apart from any other given group games because of the aesthetic qualities they possess.

I feel that this is in a way akin to movies today. If you saw say, 10 or so movies in a day at random, you may be able to pick out which are big budget Hollywood productions, HBO films, made-for-TV movies, and low-budget straight to DVD productions. Depending on who you ask, it may be difficult to pinpoint why these differences are so readily apparent, but anyone will tell you that they are definitely there.

So why does all of this matter? Well, I feel that this will give these studios the resources, funding, commercial success, and recognition, among other things that they need to better do their jobs. Exclusives are more relevant now than ever, and this disparity is a key point as to why. It's no big secret that it's more and more difficult, especially with different programming paradigms, for multiplatform games to show the brunt of their console's power. This burden is set squarely on the shoulders of exclusives now, and they certainly are making the best out of it. Whereas some games look like higher res PS2 ports, others genuinely look like they took a generational lap. I think that this gap will only continue to widen as this generation moves forward, and consumers will notice it.

Studios like Insomniac are bringing in the cash, getting the support from Sony, and are fulfilling their vision in their games. Same goes for ND. Now, a lot of the studios that had trouble getting recognition, like Media Molecule and Guerrilla, have a bolstered rep now because what they're offering looks that much more impressive than what else is out there. Their titles literally command our attention and respect, and in the same way a production like Spider-Man will garner more coverage and anticipation as opposed to a television or HBO movie.

This really works in the favor of other dev houses like Team ICO and Santa Monica, who ave yet to show us what they've got under the table. We're all talking about the next entries in the GoW and SotC franchises though, and when they're shown, I fully expect them to knock our socks off in a similar fashion to how other games have done.

If the success they achieve mirrors this anticipation, then I think that's the best thing in the world for the industry, because it will promote more resources to fuel better game development, and we as the user base will be there to reap the benefits. A symbiotic relationship like no other, and I like the concept. In the past, if a good developer released a good game, it was all too easy for the public to not even bat an eyelash. Like I said though, good looking exclusives demand our respect these days, and I foresee less good games falling by the wayside as they have in the past.

In conclusion I really feel that the exclusive is more important now than before. Right along with that go the first party development studios. I hate to see these big corporations like Activision, Ubi, and EA soak up studios like Bioware, Pandemic, and Bizarre. It hurts, it really does because then we may not see these exclusives take advantage of a system and blow us away. Sony's first party strength is a killer advantage, because with more and more studios going multi(I'm looking at you, Capcom), they, along with MS and Nintendo of course, have to rely upon themselves further.

I just hope that I'm right and we'll start seeing the better studios be afforded all of the tools they need to continue making stellar games.
 

EVILPS3

Master Poster
Jul 3, 2007
3,073
0
0
32
#2
I play mostly multi platform games on the console of my choice (PS3). But i think exclusives are extremely important these days they are a dying breed and i for one would hate to see them go.
 

Hybrid007

Dedicated Member
Sep 5, 2007
1,165
0
0
27
#3
Yea, i agree. People buy consoles for what systems have the best games. The best games usually come from exclusives because of the support they get.
 
Nov 13, 2007
183
0
0
31
#4
Nice post man. I agree, multi-platform games never seem to reach the same heights as exclusive games in terms of polish. It was the reason I was disappointed when Assassin's Creed went multi-platform.

Graphics have become much more important this generation. And generally multi-platform games don't look as good as exclusive titles.

Also I find that exclusive titles themselves have a different look and feel based on the console it is on. I find Sony's line-up much more exciting and varied than Microsoft's though there are a few titles on the Xbox that I would be willing to buy one for (Project Offset).
 
Apr 1, 2007
4,133
0
0
30
#5
Exclusives are more important know simply because gaming is more mainstream know and allot more people play games know, and if there aren't no good exclusives there is no reason to buy one certain console.
 

oas

Superior Member
Aug 4, 2006
936
2
0
33
#6
I think it counts more for me becuase when i was young i didn't know about exclusives i just bought the games i liked xD
 

daevv

The Mega Man
May 28, 2007
6,343
0
0
Newfoundland!
#7
I agree!
A exclusive game is a school yard taunt way of saying "look what I got and you don't". Thats the way the world runs, everyone trys to 1up each other and what better way for a PS3 or 360 owner to do that than with a Final Fantasy or a Mass Effect.
 

Terrabit

Superior Member
Dec 27, 2007
561
0
0
45
#8
Honestly, I think exclusives are going the way of the dinosaur with the exception of the in house developer companies. Be it good or bad. There's just too much money (sometimes millions) involved in developing games to just ignore half the market on another platform (and PC's) when that business is just a port away. "Timed" exclusives we may see more of, I think. As that way one of the console makers gets a 1up on the competition and the developers end up getting the whole business eventually. I can't imagine how much money Micro$oft is paying for these exclusives, as it would have to be at least the same amount as the developer company would make selling the title to the competing consoles.
 
Mar 9, 2007
272
0
0
34
#9
Agreed. The top 3 mulit-platform games out right now that really made my jaw drop are Assassin's Creed, Burnout Paradise, and Devil May Cry 4. DMC should've stayed exclusive, though. I'm still burnt about that, Capcom!
 

Paper Shredder

Dedicated Member
Dec 16, 2007
1,297
0
0
37
#10
Relevant? Absolutely. I would say a high majority of PS3/360 owners THAT I KNOW bought their systems because a few games on those specific machines AND everyone I know that owns both did so because of them knowing that now and in the future games will continue siding with one system and they don't want to be left out in the cold for one system if they REALLY want to play that game
 
Sep 5, 2006
2,537
0
0
33
#11
[QUOTE="Terrabit, post: 0]Honestly, I think exclusives are going the way of the dinosaur with the exception of the in house developer companies. Be it good or bad. There's just too much money (sometimes millions) involved in developing games to just ignore half the market on another platform (and PC's) when that business is just a port away. "Timed" exclusives we may see more of, I think. As that way one of the console makers gets a 1up on the competition and the developers end up getting the whole business eventually. I can't imagine how much money Micro$oft is paying for these exclusives, as it would have to be at least the same amount as the developer company would make selling the title to the competing consoles.[/QUOTE]
That's exactly why they're so crucial these days. More and more developers, and big ones at that, are being bought up by big name publishers. With that obviously comes the loss of specialized projects, so the console makers have to rely more and more on their own studios to produce exclusives.

This is big for Sony because their first party dev strength and the franchises associated with their brand name are very strong, and if they want to continue their success, they had better stay that way.

Within 2 years, I expect the price advantage of the competitors to be more of a non-issue, and the deciding factor for 99% of gamers by then will be compelling software. All consoles will have their share of multiplats, but the way exclusives are looking these days and in the future, they are the selling point for consoles more than they've ever been. Just my opinion.