The mass of an exoplanet

miickEe

Superior Member
Jan 31, 2006
652
0
0
www.miickee.net
#1
Hey there guys. If I could all use your collective wisdom then maybe I can pass my exam on thursday.

Okies.. we have to determine the mass of an exoplanet.. I have no idea at all, and we have limited material for reference and there is an even smaller amount on the internet.. If anyone has done work similar to this in senior physics then please reply to this thread with HELP! SOS!

Just had to make it dramatic. xD
 

Hexadecimal

Elite Member
Jun 12, 2006
1,595
0
0
33
#2
Could you elaborate? An exoplanet is just a planet that is not of our planetary system. So your problem isn't making much sense to me right now :?
 

miickEe

Superior Member
Jan 31, 2006
652
0
0
www.miickee.net
#3
Alright.. by manipulating the equations below, we are needed to be able to determine the mass of an exoplanet, M. Not the actual mass, but a way to determine it..
Equation 3.1 - F = GM1M2/d^2
Equation 3.2 - F = M1V1^2/x1 = M2V2^2/x2
Equation 3.3 - M = 4(pi)^2d^3/GT^2
Equation 3.4 - T = 2(pi)x1/v1 = 2(pi)x2/v2

Also, we have to prove:
M = 4(pi)^2d^3/GT^2
Meaning that we have to explain how it is derived, like which original equations were used/manipulated to get that equation. We are so stuck for it.

*((pi) being the symbol pi, cannot add it on here).