News

PS4 sales success shows no sign of slowing down, has sold-in nearly 30 million

Sony has announced that it sold four million PlayStation 4s during the three months ended September 30, bringing its cumulative sell-in (that’s the number of consoles shipped to retailers) figure to 29.3 million units worldwide. 


The PS4 launched in November 2013, although is already tracking ahead of the PS2, which had sold 24.99 million units during the same point its lifecycle. The PS3 managed 16.6 million and the Xbox 360 13.4 million, though the Wii remains the clear winner at 34.55 million units sold. Still, there’s no doubt that PS4 is well on its way to becoming one of Sony’s best-selling consoles; in fact, analysts reckon the machine will go on to sell around 130 million during its lifetime, putting it just behind PS2. 

In fact, PS4’s success has resulted in Sony raising its forecast for the console during its 2015 financial year, predicting sales of 17.5 million for its flagship system. It also noted that PS4 software sales are on the rise, though perhaps unsurprisingly, PS3 sales are in decline. Crucially, the Japanese electronics giant returned to profitability during Q2, posting a net income of 33.6 billion yen. 

Sony’s latest financial report comes hot on the heels of news that PS4 has sold well over 25 million units worldwide. The format holder is currently promoting a number of new PS4 titles at Paris Games Week, and took to the stage Tuesday evening to unveil a slew of new games including Quantic Dream’s DetroitDriveClub Bikes, and Tekken 7. In addition, it also provided some new footage of Uncharted 4: A Thief’s EndStar Wars Battlefront, and No Man’s Sky, alongside some PlayStation VR software including Robinson: The Journey. Sadly, we still don’t know exactly when we can get our hands on the virtual reality headset, although hopefully we’ll hear something more at the PlayStation Experience in December.

Be sure to read our PS4 deals guide for those of you who have yet to make the jump to Sony’s current-gen system.