Stealth Inc. A Clone In The Dark Review: death is inevitable in Curve's thought-provoking platformer

Review Score

Stealth Inc. A Clone In the Dark

PSU Review Score
7.5
Avg. user review score:
7.0

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Summary

A solid puzzle-platformer with a retro-look that will either frustrate or delight with its devilishly-designed challenges.

We like

  • Great level design makes puzzles a real challenge.
  • An in-depth level editor to play around.
  • Pick-up-and-play appeal, short levels makes it great for Vita sessions on the move.

We dislike

  • You die a lot so the increasingly difficult challenge will not be to everyone's taste.
  • Feels like a game from the past. Mind you...if you like retro?

See PSU's review on Metacritic & GameRankings

Stealth Inc. A Clone In The Dark doesn't quite have the same ring to it as Stealth Bastard, but Curve Studio’s trade-in of the original eye-catching name for a rather dull sounding play on Infogrames’ once popular survival horror title, certainly hasn’t affected the enjoyable mix of platforming and puzzle-solving that made it so popular as a freemium title.

Available as part of the cross-buy initiative (available on PS3 and PS Vita for the price of one), it’s actually a big shame that the name was dropped because the words ‘Stealth Bastard’ actually sum up the game pretty well. You see, Stealth Inc. is not an easy game to master; in fact – and here’s our chance to swear and get away with it - it’s a real bastard.

Players control a robotic clone through a variety of test chambers/obstacle courses filled with deadly traps in order to get from ‘A’ to’ B’. Retro-style graphics (a frequently used description for ‘created on a budget’ and ‘arty’ in the world of indie titles) make it look dated but clever level design and good use of light and dark to force tactical play ensures there’s plenty of fun to be had out of this addictive 2d platfomer.

Gameplay consists of increasingly difficult stages comprising of short levels or test chambers that can take less than a minute to complete should you work out the exit strategy quickly. Each chamber is a timed challenge and the quicker you reach the exit the better the rank you gain and the higher up the global online leaderboard you rise. Through there’s no real narrative to speak of, Stealth Inc. has a spy theme as you attempt to avoid the glare from CCTV cameras, dodge lasers and hack terminals to escape each level while in control of a robotic, goggle-wearing clone.

The spy concept translates into stealth play which has given Curve the perfect excuse to make excellent use of light and shadow. Consequently, players spend plenty of time sneaking through the shadows and trying to stay in the dark to progress through levels undetected. Step in the light and you get fried by lasers. Consequently, death is inevitable and frequent, and as levels become more intricate and dotted with traps the challenge gets tougher. As a result, come the end of stage two, you’ll either be banging your head up the wall and searching frantically online for a video walkthrough, or you’ll revel in the challenge and just won’t want to let it beat you.

The toe-tapping electronic music plays hypnotically in the background and a timer ticks away in your peripheral vision both giving you a sense of unwanted urgency. Yet Stealth Inc. is largely about standing still and thinking before you move. Surveying the surroundings and working out as quickly as possible a safe route to the exit. In a similar vein to Metal Gear Solid’s stealth sections, there’s a fair amount of observation involved as you watch the patterns of the moving light sources and robotic sentries and then move swiftly into dark areas where you can’t be spotted.

Logic, timing and luck all play a part while traditional platforming features, such as the ability to crouch, jump up to ledges and push objects around the environments in order to activate pressure switches or reach a platform, make gameplay instantly accessible and comfortably familiar/predictable.

Despite the time-worn feel, however, level design is excellent and the clever use of light and dark makes most levels unpredictable and very challenging. The challenge culminates at the end of each of the eight stages with a boss battle against a Sentinel in an area full of light traps and trigger points that set off lasers. Having to work out how to avoid the glare of the Sentinel and escape the level really taxes your brain and there’s a real feeling of satisfaction gained from completing a stage.

There’s also some decent extra content too. Unlockable powers give you access to gadgets such as an anti-light shield or a camouflage suit to give you a helping hand, while an in-depth level editor allows you to create new levels. It’s rare in a such a modestly-priced game that you see a fully-featured editor, but in Stealth Inc. you have all the tools to make a complicated level full of ... (continued on next page) ----

A gamer since the days of the ZX Spectrum, Steven Williamson now works as General Manager for PSU. He's supposed to be managing, but if you're reading this, it means he's dipped into editorial again. Follow @steven_gamer
 
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