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Final Fantasy 7 Remake battle system ‘different to Crisis Core,’ but is action-based

Square Enix’s Yoshinori Kitase and Tetsuya Nomura have shared some more details on the combat system for the hotly anticipated Final Fantasy VII Remake on PlayStation 4.

Speaking during an interview with Famitsu magazine (via GeekSnack), Nomura-san described the RPG’s combat as action-based, though was quick to note it is completely different from Crisis Core: Final Fantasy VII. 

"If I have to say, it’s an action based system. It’s completely different from Crisis Core. Not that strong in action such as in arcade Dissidia Final Fantasy or KH (Kingdom Hearts)."

He also seemed to imply that FFVII Remake’s combat system will offer something unique, despite including elements of ATB. Beyond that, he was unable to provide any further info on the matter.

"As a matter of fact, there’s ATB. But it’s not like we render an attack after the ATB gauge is filled. The action system will be the one FFVII alone can deliver."

Final Fantasy VII Remake has yet to receive a release date, although will be playable first on PS4. The game was showcased during Sony’s PlayStation Experience 2015 press conference, where we were treated to our first look at the game in action. Square Enix later confirmed that the remake will be released in episodic form, as it suggested the game would have to be condensed if it were launched as a single experience.

The development team are pushing for character visuals on par with that of the popular CG movie, Final Fantasy VII: Advent Children. In addition, the PC port of the original Final Fantasy VII is now available to download for the PS4 complete with Trophy support via the PlayStation Store. The remake was announced during E3 2015 after more than a decade of rumors, after Square Enix first showcased the introduction sequence to Final Fantasy VII running on PS3 hardware as a tech demo.

Final Fantasy VII was released on the PlayStation in 1997. The game started development in 1994 and was originally conceived for the SNES and later Nintendo 64, though production moved to PSOne due to the storage limitations imposed by cartridges. Final Fantasy VII has sold over 11 million copies globally to date and is considered by many fans to be the best entry in the venerable JRPG franchise to date.